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TITLE
Railway Staff at Fortrose
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BLACK_ISLE_RAILWAY_02
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hannah Alexander
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
41295
KEYWORDS
audios
railways
railroads
trains
stations
freight
goods trains

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The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.

In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the railway staff.

Hannah: We knew all the fire-, the station engine drivers and the like of that because they lived in these six houses. There's six houses as you're coming in, on the right hand side. And everybody knew them, and they would let the boys onto the footplate while they turned the engine and thinks like that.

Interviewer: And you were saying that, the railway cottages were full of the workers and they would have young families?

Hannah: Oh yes. In fact, I was just saying the other night - I mean they were small, they weren't big houses, they're not big houses - but there was, there was seven; one engine driver had seven of a family. And the porter next door had eight, I think. You just wondered where they all stayed. There was a guard in one end. And then there was a surface man. And then there was an engine driver. Then there was a porter, and a porter, and an engine driver, in these six houses. And the stationmaster lived in the house which stands apart; a nice house a little bit further along.

Interviewer: And was he considered, a boss, like an upper class person?

Hannah: Oh well, yes, of course he always had his uniform, and his cheese-cutter. And likewise the clerk, the chief -, the clerk that would be in the office with him. And then there would be two firemen, and they were, always lived - They very often were single men, they lived locally. And then there was the lorry driver, who drove the horse and lorry.

Interviewer: The people that worked on the railway were they. Do you think they were brought in for the job or were they recruited from local people? Do you know?

Hannah: No, they were- Well when I remember the engine drivers, you know, they weren't local. You know, when I think back there was none of them actually born locally. But in no time-, but their families were born locally so their, you know, they became locals, as it were. But there were two engine drivers, two firemen, a guard, a couple of porters, and the stationmaster and a, and a clerk - don't think there was anyone - and the lorry man. I think that'd be the entire staff of, you know, of the station.

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Railway Staff at Fortrose

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

audios; railways; railroads; trains; stations; freight; goods trains;

Janine Donald

Am Baile: Memories of the Black Isle Railway

The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the railway staff.<br /> <br /> Hannah: We knew all the fire-, the station engine drivers and the like of that because they lived in these six houses. There's six houses as you're coming in, on the right hand side. And everybody knew them, and they would let the boys onto the footplate while they turned the engine and thinks like that. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And you were saying that, the railway cottages were full of the workers and they would have young families?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Oh yes. In fact, I was just saying the other night - I mean they were small, they weren't big houses, they're not big houses - but there was, there was seven; one engine driver had seven of a family. And the porter next door had eight, I think. You just wondered where they all stayed. There was a guard in one end. And then there was a surface man. And then there was an engine driver. Then there was a porter, and a porter, and an engine driver, in these six houses. And the stationmaster lived in the house which stands apart; a nice house a little bit further along. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And was he considered, a boss, like an upper class person? <br /> <br /> Hannah: Oh well, yes, of course he always had his uniform, and his cheese-cutter. And likewise the clerk, the chief -, the clerk that would be in the office with him. And then there would be two firemen, and they were, always lived - They very often were single men, they lived locally. And then there was the lorry driver, who drove the horse and lorry. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: The people that worked on the railway were they. Do you think they were brought in for the job or were they recruited from local people? Do you know?<br /> <br /> Hannah: No, they were- Well when I remember the engine drivers, you know, they weren't local. You know, when I think back there was none of them actually born locally. But in no time-, but their families were born locally so their, you know, they became locals, as it were. But there were two engine drivers, two firemen, a guard, a couple of porters, and the stationmaster and a, and a clerk - don't think there was anyone - and the lorry man. I think that'd be the entire staff of, you know, of the station.