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TITLE
Goods and Livestock on Black Isle Railway
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BLACK_ISLE_RAILWAY_05
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hannah Alexander
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
41298
KEYWORDS
audios
railways
railroads
trains
stations
freight
goods trains

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The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.

In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the different types of goods and livestock carried on the line.

Hannah: We had a bakery in the High Street and, it was before, actually, I was living there, but the flour would come in on the railway and it would be unloaded in the goods shed and then loaded onto the lorry, and the lorry man would come down and in the back gate, and unload the flour. The farmers would be coming with potatoes and, and that, and loading them on the train. But then they also - quite a lot of grain and potatoes went away by boat, because we had the wee harbour. And likewise, coal would come in by boat but it would also come in on the train. And the lorry driver delivered all sorts of packages and parcels and - And of course the mail came in by -, aye, the mail came in on the train in those days.

Interviewer: And was there any livestock?

Hannah: Oh yes, yes, uh-huh. There was the loading bank. I mean, they would eh, my father would - if he was putting away sheep - they would maybe stay here overnight. And then they would go to the loading bank in the morning and they'd be loaded onto the trucks, to go to Dingwall. And then of course big lorries took over, you know, motor lorries and that took all that work off the, from the railway.

Interviewer: I found an old timetable, quite an old one. And, it was talking about special fares for, for instance, the fishing girls at Avoch. If they were taking their fish into Inverness, there was special train fares for them.

Hannah: Oh, yes, uh-huh, uh-huh. Of course there was some of the Avoch, the few that used to go out, they would be cycling. There was one woman, she used to cycle immense distances with her fish, you know, on her bike.

Interviewer: On her back?

Hannah: On the bike. Aye.

Interviewer: And the fish on the back?

Hannah: Aye, she would have some on her back and some on the front, you know? And I suppose they all, all the women who went away to the fishing, that was down to the like Yarmouth and that, they would all go south by train.

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Goods and Livestock on Black Isle Railway

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

audios; railways; railroads; trains; stations; freight; goods trains;

Janine Donald

Am Baile: Memories of the Black Isle Railway

The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the different types of goods and livestock carried on the line.<br /> <br /> Hannah: We had a bakery in the High Street and, it was before, actually, I was living there, but the flour would come in on the railway and it would be unloaded in the goods shed and then loaded onto the lorry, and the lorry man would come down and in the back gate, and unload the flour. The farmers would be coming with potatoes and, and that, and loading them on the train. But then they also - quite a lot of grain and potatoes went away by boat, because we had the wee harbour. And likewise, coal would come in by boat but it would also come in on the train. And the lorry driver delivered all sorts of packages and parcels and - And of course the mail came in by -, aye, the mail came in on the train in those days. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And was there any livestock? <br /> <br /> Hannah: Oh yes, yes, uh-huh. There was the loading bank. I mean, they would eh, my father would - if he was putting away sheep - they would maybe stay here overnight. And then they would go to the loading bank in the morning and they'd be loaded onto the trucks, to go to Dingwall. And then of course big lorries took over, you know, motor lorries and that took all that work off the, from the railway.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: I found an old timetable, quite an old one. And, it was talking about special fares for, for instance, the fishing girls at Avoch. If they were taking their fish into Inverness, there was special train fares for them. <br /> <br /> Hannah: Oh, yes, uh-huh, uh-huh. Of course there was some of the Avoch, the few that used to go out, they would be cycling. There was one woman, she used to cycle immense distances with her fish, you know, on her bike.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: On her back?<br /> <br /> Hannah: On the bike. Aye. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And the fish on the back?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Aye, she would have some on her back and some on the front, you know? And I suppose they all, all the women who went away to the fishing, that was down to the like Yarmouth and that, they would all go south by train.