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TITLE
A Day Trip into Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BLACK_ISLE_RAILWAY_07
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hannah Alexander
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
41300
KEYWORDS
audios
railways
railroads
trains
stations
freight
goods trains

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The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.

In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the day trips into Inverness.

Hannah: They used to run on a Thursday evening, sometimes, a special excursion into Inverness, maybe to the theatre. And likewise on a Saturday afternoon we would get in for one and six, one shilling and sixpence. You would go in to Inverness about one o'clock and you would come back, half past ten or eleven at night. Men would go to the football match and the women would go shopping and then you would go and have high tea and then you'd go to the pictures. All for less than a pound.

Interviewer: Yes, uh-huh. But obviously when the train stopped you couldn't do that?

Hannah: Oh no, no no. I mean, in many ways it was a great pity.

Interviewer: Uh-huh. Cos, you know, there was a bit of a gap between the trains stopping and everybody having cars?

Hannah: Oh yes, but then of course there were buses you see? Not all that frequent. Not as frequent as they are now. But, well you just had to - you worked your trip to Inverness round the bus really.

Interviewer: And would you have been able to go to the pictures? Or did they not run late enough?

Hannah: Not quite so- Well, you could go in the afternoon to the pictures. But when you went in by train you could go to a performance at six o'clock, you see, you could have high tea at five, go to the pictures and be out in time to catch the train home.

Interviewer: And this was La Scala, was it?

Hannah: Eh, yes, the La Scala, and the Playhouse.

Interviewer: And where would you have your high tea?

Hannah: Mostly in - it's no longer there - our favourite place was the Carlton, which was on Bridge Street, privately owned. I think you got a high tea for about one and six or something. And by a high tea I mean something with a knife and fork and a three-tired cake stand. We were just speaking about that yesterday saying, you know the high tea was a very - Scots high tea - was a good thing.

Interviewer: French fancies?

Hannah: Bread, pancakes and scones, cakes on the top.

Interviewer: Yes, that's right, ah well I remember that.

Hannah: Do you?

Interviewer: Oh yes, yes, uh-huh.

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A Day Trip into Inverness

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

audios; railways; railroads; trains; stations; freight; goods trains;

Janine Donald

Am Baile: Memories of the Black Isle Railway

The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the day trips into Inverness.<br /> <br /> Hannah: They used to run on a Thursday evening, sometimes, a special excursion into Inverness, maybe to the theatre. And likewise on a Saturday afternoon we would get in for one and six, one shilling and sixpence. You would go in to Inverness about one o'clock and you would come back, half past ten or eleven at night. Men would go to the football match and the women would go shopping and then you would go and have high tea and then you'd go to the pictures. All for less than a pound.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, uh-huh. But obviously when the train stopped you couldn't do that? <br /> <br /> Hannah: Oh no, no no. I mean, in many ways it was a great pity.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Uh-huh. Cos, you know, there was a bit of a gap between the trains stopping and everybody having cars?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Oh yes, but then of course there were buses you see? Not all that frequent. Not as frequent as they are now. But, well you just had to - you worked your trip to Inverness round the bus really.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And would you have been able to go to the pictures? Or did they not run late enough?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Not quite so- Well, you could go in the afternoon to the pictures. But when you went in by train you could go to a performance at six o'clock, you see, you could have high tea at five, go to the pictures and be out in time to catch the train home.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And this was La Scala, was it?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Eh, yes, the La Scala, and the Playhouse.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And where would you have your high tea?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Mostly in - it's no longer there - our favourite place was the Carlton, which was on Bridge Street, privately owned. I think you got a high tea for about one and six or something. And by a high tea I mean something with a knife and fork and a three-tired cake stand. We were just speaking about that yesterday saying, you know the high tea was a very - Scots high tea - was a good thing.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: French fancies? <br /> <br /> Hannah: Bread, pancakes and scones, cakes on the top.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, that's right, ah well I remember that.<br /> <br /> Hannah: Do you?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Oh yes, yes, uh-huh.