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TITLE
Effects of Black Isle Railway on Tourism
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BLACK_ISLE_RAILWAY_08
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hannah Alexander
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
41301
KEYWORDS
audios
railways
railroads
trains
stations
freight
goods trains

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The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.

In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the holidaymakers who came on the train.

Interviewer: Did you notice a difference in people coming on holiday?

Hannah: We had more holidaymakers who would come, they would perhaps come - There was some families from Glasgow, they came at the beginning of July and they waited until the end of August and father just came up for the Fair or for the odd weekend. But, you know, before long they were coming, but in cars.

Interviewer: Yes, yes, but, would they bring their, like a trunk or something...

Hannah: Yes, their luggage.

Interviewer: ...if they were coming for that length of time they would need to - yes.

Hannah: And I remember one Jewish family, they brought all their pots and pans and things like that, you know, because they were - They brought everything practically and they took this house for a month.

Interviewer: And would this be a holiday house?

Hannah: Well, it might, yes. No. The people that they were renting it from would be 'doing' for them, as they said, you know? They would be doing the cooking. But it was all done in their own pots and pans because they were very orthodox. It was quite unusual.

Interviewer: Yes.

Hannah: And I'll give you an instance. The boy - one of the boys - quite often they would come in - You see, then, after I was married we had a bakery in the High Street - what's now an antique shop - and a lot of people came in before the shop would open in the morning and this boy he used to come in every morning for his rolls, you see, while he was on holiday. And my husband was making doughnuts, he was - every morning, and he said to the boy one morning, 'Would you like a doughnut, Victor?' 'Well, no thank you, Mr Alexander. No thank you'. The next day he came he said, 'What kind of oil are you using Mr Alexander? 'Oh,' my husband said, 'Vegetable oil' 'Oh, yes. I'll take a doughnut'. That's true. I remember. We thought, 'Well, good for you' that way. He was just quite a youngster

Interviewer: He must have been keen, to get the doughnuts?

Hannah: Well he wanted, but you see he wouldn't take the doughnut if he thought it was in animal fat. Likely he went home and he asked, and [Laughter]. It was quite a nice little story, you know, when you think about it.

Interviewer: And what about, was there hotels in Fortrose at the time?

Hannah: Well, there was just the one hotel, and the one in Rosemarkie, of course, which was much bigger and there were more houses that let. They let the rooms and the owner of the house would provide, you know, the work, would look after, cook the food. The people would bring in their own food and the lady of the house would cook it for them and serve it so that they were virtually on holiday apart from buying their food but then that gradually changed, you know, over the years and -

Interviewer: And when they arrived in Fortrose, say they were going to Rosemarkie, for their holiday, how would they get from - ?

Hannah: They must, they must have been - Well, the luggage would go down on the lorry, the lorry would go down, with the luggage and they probably walked. It was easy to walk, you see, and there weren't many cars or anything A great many of the people came on holiday it was for golf, and they used to bathe and tennis and bowls and walks and that. But there's nothing like the same number of people come nowadays.

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Effects of Black Isle Railway on Tourism

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

audios; railways; railroads; trains; stations; freight; goods trains;

Janine Donald

Am Baile: Memories of the Black Isle Railway

The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the holidaymakers who came on the train.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you notice a difference in people coming on holiday?<br /> <br /> Hannah: We had more holidaymakers who would come, they would perhaps come - There was some families from Glasgow, they came at the beginning of July and they waited until the end of August and father just came up for the Fair or for the odd weekend. But, you know, before long they were coming, but in cars.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes, yes, but, would they bring their, like a trunk or something...<br /> <br /> Hannah: Yes, their luggage. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: ...if they were coming for that length of time they would need to - yes.<br /> <br /> Hannah: And I remember one Jewish family, they brought all their pots and pans and things like that, you know, because they were - They brought everything practically and they took this house for a month.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And would this be a holiday house? <br /> <br /> Hannah: Well, it might, yes. No. The people that they were renting it from would be 'doing' for them, as they said, you know? They would be doing the cooking. But it was all done in their own pots and pans because they were very orthodox. It was quite unusual.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Yes.<br /> <br /> Hannah: And I'll give you an instance. The boy - one of the boys - quite often they would come in - You see, then, after I was married we had a bakery in the High Street - what's now an antique shop - and a lot of people came in before the shop would open in the morning and this boy he used to come in every morning for his rolls, you see, while he was on holiday. And my husband was making doughnuts, he was - every morning, and he said to the boy one morning, 'Would you like a doughnut, Victor?' 'Well, no thank you, Mr Alexander. No thank you'. The next day he came he said, 'What kind of oil are you using Mr Alexander? 'Oh,' my husband said, 'Vegetable oil' 'Oh, yes. I'll take a doughnut'. That's true. I remember. We thought, 'Well, good for you' that way. He was just quite a youngster <br /> <br /> Interviewer: He must have been keen, to get the doughnuts? <br /> <br /> Hannah: Well he wanted, but you see he wouldn't take the doughnut if he thought it was in animal fat. Likely he went home and he asked, and [Laughter]. It was quite a nice little story, you know, when you think about it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: And what about, was there hotels in Fortrose at the time?<br /> <br /> Hannah: Well, there was just the one hotel, and the one in Rosemarkie, of course, which was much bigger and there were more houses that let. They let the rooms and the owner of the house would provide, you know, the work, would look after, cook the food. The people would bring in their own food and the lady of the house would cook it for them and serve it so that they were virtually on holiday apart from buying their food but then that gradually changed, you know, over the years and - <br /> <br /> Interviewer: And when they arrived in Fortrose, say they were going to Rosemarkie, for their holiday, how would they get from - ? <br /> <br /> Hannah: They must, they must have been - Well, the luggage would go down on the lorry, the lorry would go down, with the luggage and they probably walked. It was easy to walk, you see, and there weren't many cars or anything A great many of the people came on holiday it was for golf, and they used to bathe and tennis and bowls and walks and that. But there's nothing like the same number of people come nowadays.