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TITLE
Black Isle Railway During the War
EXTERNAL ID
PC_BLACK_ISLE_RAILWAY_09
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Hannah Alexander
SOURCE
Janine Donald
ASSET ID
41302
KEYWORDS
audios
railways
railroads
trains
stations
freight
goods trains

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The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.



In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the war years.



Interviewer: Do you remember the railway being used during the war? Was it used any differently, or?



Hannah; Well, yes, there must - Yes, soldiers, the soldiers, because we had soldiers billeted, they took over quite a lot of the houses in the place, you see. So they must have come. I suppose some of them would have come by train but some of them would also have come on their lorries. Of course, there were, there were - Canadian and Newfoundland foresters working locally and all that. A lot of that wood probably went away by, by train. But do you know when you were young - well not that I was so young I was in my late teens, early twenties then - you just sort of, didn't pay a lot of attention. But there was certainly a lot of people billeted locally, because the hotel was taken over and St Annes, which was a big house along at the other end of the town. MacKenzie Lodge was taken over and then they built on a field - there was flat field between here and the beginning of Avoch - there were Nissan huts there, a lot of soldiers billeted there. And then in Rosemarkie they'd taken over the big hotel, you know, a lot of servicemen, soldiers. And then there were airmen up on the top of Mount High. They had a place where they sort of repaired aircraft there.



Interviewer: You mentioned Canadians, was that 'cos they would know about wood?



Hannah: Aye, foresters. Likewise the Newfoundlanders. The Canadians were up above Killen, if you know Killen, and the Newfoundlanders were quite separate; they were between here and Cromarty. The Canadians were in uniform, not the Newfoundlanders. The Newfoundlanders, they were so poor, a lot of them, when they came, and before you knew where they were they were all in navy blue striped suits, once they began to make a little money. But they weren't in uniform, they were quite apart. The others were really attached to the army.

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Black Isle Railway During the War

ROSS: Rosemarkie

2000s

audios; railways; railroads; trains; stations; freight; goods trains;

Janine Donald

Am Baile: Memories of the Black Isle Railway

The Black Isle Railway was originally a branch of the Highland Railway network. It carried passengers from 1894 until 1951 (freight until 1960) and ran from Muir of Ord to Fortrose with intermediary stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> In this audio extract from 2006, Hannah Alexander, a resident of Fortrose, talks about the war years.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: Do you remember the railway being used during the war? Was it used any differently, or?<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Hannah; Well, yes, there must - Yes, soldiers, the soldiers, because we had soldiers billeted, they took over quite a lot of the houses in the place, you see. So they must have come. I suppose some of them would have come by train but some of them would also have come on their lorries. Of course, there were, there were - Canadian and Newfoundland foresters working locally and all that. A lot of that wood probably went away by, by train. But do you know when you were young - well not that I was so young I was in my late teens, early twenties then - you just sort of, didn't pay a lot of attention. But there was certainly a lot of people billeted locally, because the hotel was taken over and St Annes, which was a big house along at the other end of the town. MacKenzie Lodge was taken over and then they built on a field - there was flat field between here and the beginning of Avoch - there were Nissan huts there, a lot of soldiers billeted there. And then in Rosemarkie they'd taken over the big hotel, you know, a lot of servicemen, soldiers. And then there were airmen up on the top of Mount High. They had a place where they sort of repaired aircraft there.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Interviewer: You mentioned Canadians, was that 'cos they would know about wood?<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Hannah: Aye, foresters. Likewise the Newfoundlanders. The Canadians were up above Killen, if you know Killen, and the Newfoundlanders were quite separate; they were between here and Cromarty. The Canadians were in uniform, not the Newfoundlanders. The Newfoundlanders, they were so poor, a lot of them, when they came, and before you knew where they were they were all in navy blue striped suits, once they began to make a little money. But they weren't in uniform, they were quite apart. The others were really attached to the army.