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TITLE
'Guma Slàn Do Na Fearaibh' (Here's Good Health to the People)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_SHEILA_MACKAY_01
PLACENAME
Invereshie
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Alvie
DATE OF RECORDING
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Donald Campbell
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
41323
KEYWORDS
emigration
audio

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'Guma Slan Do Na Fearaibh' (Here's Good Health to the People) was composed by Donald Campbell (known as Dòmhnall Phàil). It is sung here by Sheila Mackay of Newtonmore.

Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan
Gu talamh a' gheallaidh
Far nach fairich iad fuachd,
Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan.

'N uair dh' fhàgas s 'n t-àit' so,
Cha chuir iad mòr-mhàl oirnn
'S cha bhi an Fheill Màrtainn
'Cur nàire 'n ar gruaidh.
Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan

Gu 'm fàg sinn an tìr so
Cha chinnich aon nì ann
Tha 'm buntàt' air dol 'dhìth ann
'S cha chin iad le fuachd.
Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan.

Gheibh sinn sìod' agus sròl ann
Gheibh sinn pailteas de 'n chlòimh ann
'S ni na mnathan dhuinn clò dheth
Air seòl an Taoibh-Tuath.
Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan

Cha bhi iad 'g ar dùsgadh
Le clag Chinne-Ghiùbhsaich
Cha bhi e gu diùbhras
Ged nach dùisg sinn cho luath.
Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan

Gu talamh a' gheallaidh
Far nach fairich iad fuachd,
Gu 'm a slan do na fearaibh
Thèid thairis a' chuan.

From: 'The Poetry of Badenoch' by Thomas Sinton (1906)

Donald Campbell (1798-1875) was born in Dalnaspidal, Glen Garry, about 20 miles northwest of Pitlochry. He worked as a shepherd for most of his life but was also known as 'The Kingussie Bard'. During his lifetime the Highlands and Islands experienced phases of clearance and periods of great hardship as in the Potato Famine of 1848.

Donald's poetry reflects these events especially 'Guma Slàn do na Fearaibh' (Here's Good Health to the People) which was composed around 1838 when tenants on the Invereshie Estate left their homes for a new life in Australia. Donald was scheduled to emigrate with the group but personal circumstances prevented him from so doing. He accompanied the group as far as Oban where a total of 326 emigrants embarked on the 'St George'. Four months later the ship arrived in Sydney with five newly-born babies. Ten emigrants had died on the journey.

'Guma Slàn do na Fearaibh' is one of the most popular Gaelic songs which deals with Highlanders leaving their homeland.

The English translates as:

A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!
To the country of promise,
Where no cold will they feel.
A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!

When we're gone from this country,
Our rents will be trifling;
And Martinmas will not
Bring blush to our cheek.
A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!

We'll depart from this region,
Where nothing will flourish,
The potatoes are ruined,
And won't grow for the cold.
A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!

There we'll get silk and ribbons
We'll get wool in abundance;
And the wives will make cloth
In the style of the North.
A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!

They will not arouse us,
With the bell of Kingussie;
Nor will it much matter,
Though we wake not so soon
A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!

To the country of promise,
Where no cold will they feel.
A health to the fellows,
Who'll cross o'er the sea!

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'Guma Slàn Do Na Fearaibh' (Here's Good Health to the People)

INVERNESS: Alvie

2000s

emigration; audio

Am Baile

'Guma Slan Do Na Fearaibh' (Here's Good Health to the People) was composed by Donald Campbell (known as Dòmhnall Phàil). It is sung here by Sheila Mackay of Newtonmore.<br /> <br /> Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh <br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan<br /> Gu talamh a' gheallaidh <br /> Far nach fairich iad fuachd,<br /> Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh<br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan.<br /> <br /> 'N uair dh' fhàgas s 'n t-àit' so,<br /> Cha chuir iad mòr-mhàl oirnn<br /> 'S cha bhi an Fheill Màrtainn<br /> 'Cur nàire 'n ar gruaidh.<br /> Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh<br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan<br /> <br /> Gu 'm fàg sinn an tìr so<br /> Cha chinnich aon nì ann<br /> Tha 'm buntàt' air dol 'dhìth ann<br /> 'S cha chin iad le fuachd.<br /> Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh<br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan.<br /> <br /> Gheibh sinn sìod' agus sròl ann<br /> Gheibh sinn pailteas de 'n chlòimh ann<br /> 'S ni na mnathan dhuinn clò dheth<br /> Air seòl an Taoibh-Tuath.<br /> Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh <br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan<br /> <br /> Cha bhi iad 'g ar dùsgadh<br /> Le clag Chinne-Ghiùbhsaich<br /> Cha bhi e gu diùbhras<br /> Ged nach dùisg sinn cho luath.<br /> Gu 'm a slàn do na fearaibh <br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan<br /> <br /> Gu talamh a' gheallaidh <br /> Far nach fairich iad fuachd,<br /> Gu 'm a slan do na fearaibh<br /> Thèid thairis a' chuan.<br /> <br /> From: 'The Poetry of Badenoch' by Thomas Sinton (1906)<br /> <br /> Donald Campbell (1798-1875) was born in Dalnaspidal, Glen Garry, about 20 miles northwest of Pitlochry. He worked as a shepherd for most of his life but was also known as 'The Kingussie Bard'. During his lifetime the Highlands and Islands experienced phases of clearance and periods of great hardship as in the Potato Famine of 1848. <br /> <br /> Donald's poetry reflects these events especially 'Guma Slàn do na Fearaibh' (Here's Good Health to the People) which was composed around 1838 when tenants on the Invereshie Estate left their homes for a new life in Australia. Donald was scheduled to emigrate with the group but personal circumstances prevented him from so doing. He accompanied the group as far as Oban where a total of 326 emigrants embarked on the 'St George'. Four months later the ship arrived in Sydney with five newly-born babies. Ten emigrants had died on the journey.<br /> <br /> 'Guma Slàn do na Fearaibh' is one of the most popular Gaelic songs which deals with Highlanders leaving their homeland.<br /> <br /> The English translates as:<br /> <br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!<br /> To the country of promise,<br /> Where no cold will they feel.<br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!<br /> <br /> When we're gone from this country,<br /> Our rents will be trifling;<br /> And Martinmas will not<br /> Bring blush to our cheek.<br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!<br /> <br /> We'll depart from this region,<br /> Where nothing will flourish,<br /> The potatoes are ruined,<br /> And won't grow for the cold.<br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!<br /> <br /> There we'll get silk and ribbons<br /> We'll get wool in abundance;<br /> And the wives will make cloth<br /> In the style of the North.<br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!<br /> <br /> They will not arouse us,<br /> With the bell of Kingussie;<br /> Nor will it much matter,<br /> Though we wake not so soon<br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!<br /> <br /> To the country of promise,<br /> Where no cold will they feel.<br /> A health to the fellows,<br /> Who'll cross o'er the sea!