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TITLE
Fishing Methods used in Caithness (13)
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_41
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Alec Thomson
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
41339
KEYWORDS
audios
fishing industry
fishing
fishing boats
fishing nets
fishermen
fish

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Alec Thomson was a Thurso fishermen. In this audio he talks about street entertainment, the Salvation Army and religion.

'An then there use til be great people coman up the, ye know, ye'd hear them, for e fishing, some o at people makin shows an all at, ye know, on e street an, when e fishing time came. An on a Sunday morning ye'd hear e Salvation Army, playan aboot eight o'clock in e morning, waken ee oot o your beds then. Oh, it was great.

Interviewer: There was a man tellan me at a lot o e fishermen were very religious?

Yes, at's right. They'd all join up, ye see, that was the time o the Revival. There was a Revival spread here at one time, ye see, an I think Wick was e chief, was e heid o them. There's a chap ere in Wick, Jock Troup was his name, an he was e first man. Ah think he was e heid man, an e whole thing started in Yarmouth, I believe, at e fishing time. All along the coast, an all at Moray Firth fishing villages, and right up til Buckie an, as far as Wick. All the fishermen, they all joined at. They joined e Salvation Army. An Ah've seen, Ah've seen, Ah've seen, on a Saturday night about eight o'clock, between eight an nine o'clock, there was a Salvation Army'd have an open-air meeting, ye know? Well Ah've seen the ring, the roond ring, from e Coop right nearly right across til Woolworths [a public square in Wick], right round like at, an all the fishermen in it. An every one o em, every one o em sayan their testaments, ye know, an preachan, an- It was jist, oh is was great for til hear them. An all e Army, ye wouldna, ye wouldna hardly get a sheet in e Salvation Army it was all full up. Some o them was up in e couples [rafters]. Ye'd only get in - way up in e couples they was sittan. Oh, it was great in at days, Ah'm tellan ee. Ye'd hear em, ye'd hear em singan in e bay sometimes fan ye's coman in fae the - ye'd hear e fishermen singan in their boats, ye know, at Scraibster.'

In the 1920s there was a tremendous revival of evangelical religion among the Moray Firth fishermen. Some effects of this linger to this day, with some fishermen still being strongly religious.

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Fishing Methods used in Caithness (13)

CAITHNESS

1980s

audios; fishing industry; fishing; fishing boats; fishing nets; fishermen; fish

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Fishing

Alec Thomson was a Thurso fishermen. In this audio he talks about street entertainment, the Salvation Army and religion.<br /> <br /> 'An then there use til be great people coman up the, ye know, ye'd hear them, for e fishing, some o at people makin shows an all at, ye know, on e street an, when e fishing time came. An on a Sunday morning ye'd hear e Salvation Army, playan aboot eight o'clock in e morning, waken ee oot o your beds then. Oh, it was great. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: There was a man tellan me at a lot o e fishermen were very religious?<br /> <br /> Yes, at's right. They'd all join up, ye see, that was the time o the Revival. There was a Revival spread here at one time, ye see, an I think Wick was e chief, was e heid o them. There's a chap ere in Wick, Jock Troup was his name, an he was e first man. Ah think he was e heid man, an e whole thing started in Yarmouth, I believe, at e fishing time. All along the coast, an all at Moray Firth fishing villages, and right up til Buckie an, as far as Wick. All the fishermen, they all joined at. They joined e Salvation Army. An Ah've seen, Ah've seen, Ah've seen, on a Saturday night about eight o'clock, between eight an nine o'clock, there was a Salvation Army'd have an open-air meeting, ye know? Well Ah've seen the ring, the roond ring, from e Coop right nearly right across til Woolworths [a public square in Wick], right round like at, an all the fishermen in it. An every one o em, every one o em sayan their testaments, ye know, an preachan, an- It was jist, oh is was great for til hear them. An all e Army, ye wouldna, ye wouldna hardly get a sheet in e Salvation Army it was all full up. Some o them was up in e couples [rafters]. Ye'd only get in - way up in e couples they was sittan. Oh, it was great in at days, Ah'm tellan ee. Ye'd hear em, ye'd hear em singan in e bay sometimes fan ye's coman in fae the - ye'd hear e fishermen singan in their boats, ye know, at Scraibster.'<br /> <br /> In the 1920s there was a tremendous revival of evangelical religion among the Moray Firth fishermen. Some effects of this linger to this day, with some fishermen still being strongly religious.