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TITLE
Schooldays and Life at the Laundry in Wick
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_101
PLACENAME
Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Baba Mackay
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
41382
KEYWORDS
shools
school life

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In this audio extract, Mrs Baba Mackay talks about her schooldays in Wick. She also recalls her life in laundry service.

'Well, Ah went til e school at five, South School in Kinnaird Street. Pulled doon, of course, many years ago. Mr Smith was e headmaster. Many a happy day we hid, it was a good school, an quite a lot o my classmates are still in e toon. Left e South School at fourteen an went - no at's a lie. Ah went - Ah left e South School at twelve an Ah went til e High School until Ah was 14. Ah quite enjoyed e high school too. An when Ah left e high school Ah first went intil service, an then efter at Ah went intil e laundry. Ah was in e laundry til Ah wis aboot nineteen, married at nineteen. We've been married forty-six years now an hid seven o a family; seventeen grandchildren an six great-grandchildren.

Interviewer: What hours did ye work in e laundry?

Oh yes, we were on shifts in e laundry. It was wartime of course, an we were on shifts from six to two wan week, an two to ten e next week. An then men did a night shift, from ten till six, ten at night till six in e mornin.

Interviewer: What was yer job?

Ah well, Ah was a checker for a while, an then Ah was on e, what ee called e calender. Like a - hot rollers, ye know, like an iron. Ee put e sheets an e flat things through it. But I liked it fine, ye know. It was a hot job in e summer time but we liked it, an there's a good gang, good crowd, ye know?

Ma wages when Ah first started workan in service wis a pound a month, a pound a calendar month. It didna matter if there wis twenty days, eh twenty-eight days, thiry days, or whatever, ye just got e pound, an ye worked from six in e mornin till two, an ye got off fae two till five, an ye went back at five til do e tea till, till half past seven, an ye hid dishes an everything to do. An at wis for a pound.

Interviewer: An where was at?

At was in a private hoose in West Park. It was a Miss George, at was George e, the newsagents. They hid e John George's in Bridge Street.'

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Schooldays and Life at the Laundry in Wick

CAITHNESS: Wick

1980s

shools; school life

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Life in Wick

In this audio extract, Mrs Baba Mackay talks about her schooldays in Wick. She also recalls her life in laundry service.<br /> <br /> 'Well, Ah went til e school at five, South School in Kinnaird Street. Pulled doon, of course, many years ago. Mr Smith was e headmaster. Many a happy day we hid, it was a good school, an quite a lot o my classmates are still in e toon. Left e South School at fourteen an went - no at's a lie. Ah went - Ah left e South School at twelve an Ah went til e High School until Ah was 14. Ah quite enjoyed e high school too. An when Ah left e high school Ah first went intil service, an then efter at Ah went intil e laundry. Ah was in e laundry til Ah wis aboot nineteen, married at nineteen. We've been married forty-six years now an hid seven o a family; seventeen grandchildren an six great-grandchildren. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What hours did ye work in e laundry?<br /> <br /> Oh yes, we were on shifts in e laundry. It was wartime of course, an we were on shifts from six to two wan week, an two to ten e next week. An then men did a night shift, from ten till six, ten at night till six in e mornin. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What was yer job?<br /> <br /> Ah well, Ah was a checker for a while, an then Ah was on e, what ee called e calender. Like a - hot rollers, ye know, like an iron. Ee put e sheets an e flat things through it. But I liked it fine, ye know. It was a hot job in e summer time but we liked it, an there's a good gang, good crowd, ye know?<br /> <br /> Ma wages when Ah first started workan in service wis a pound a month, a pound a calendar month. It didna matter if there wis twenty days, eh twenty-eight days, thiry days, or whatever, ye just got e pound, an ye worked from six in e mornin till two, an ye got off fae two till five, an ye went back at five til do e tea till, till half past seven, an ye hid dishes an everything to do. An at wis for a pound. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An where was at?<br /> <br /> At was in a private hoose in West Park. It was a Miss George, at was George e, the newsagents. They hid e John George's in Bridge Street.'