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TITLE
Purchasing Foodstuffs in Wick
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_107
PLACENAME
Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Baba Mackay
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
41388
KEYWORDS
mobile shops
grocery shops

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In this audio extract, Mrs Baba Mackay talks about the milk being delivered in Wick. She also recalls other delivery vans including the grocer's, the butcher's and the fish van.

Interviewer: An did ee used til get yer milk delivered by e milkman?

Yes, Martin's milk, an Geordie Bain, e dairy in Dempster Street, used to come roond. We used tae take milk fae Martin's. Came til e door, a big urn on e back, a milk churn, I should say, on e back wi a tap on it an they measured oot yer pint in yer joug or yer pail, or whatever ye hid, and at's [?] went til e door for it. He put in e jug til ee

Interviewer: An was at in a horse an cairt?

Yes.

Interviewer: An can ye mind how much at used to cost?

Oh it wasna much, aboot a penny, Ah think. I wouldna say, a penny or a penny-ha'penny for e pint o milk, ye know? Ye see, ye didna buy a lot o milk cos ye hedna a lot o pennies, an at was it.

Interviewer: An did there used tae be any vans that used tae come rood, or anything like at?

Well, no when we were young cos they'd a shoppie, as I say, at every corner but then when we went up til Dunnet Avenue, when e new housing scheme started up ere, there was a Coop van at used til come fae Pulteney, ye know? We used til get messages fae e Coop van, it was right handy. Didnae hev til go til e street for things, ye know? An then there was a butcher van too, ye know, an a fish van came every week; Geordie Mackenzie's in Barrogill Street, used til get him every Thursday. But we never seemed tae want, ye know. If ye hed two or three shillings, ye could get fit ye wanted. It was up til yourself fit ye hed. An Ah always used tae say by e time at ee paid every chiel on Setterday nicht, ye hedna got buy e Sunday paper on Sunday, ee would rake in e bairns' banks til get for e Sunday paper. We was quite happy wi e whole o them. Ah mean e bairns, Ah always think, were very content. If ye hed a shilling, ye gave it til them, if ye hedna, ye hedna, and at's all. Ah mean, they didnae get big presents like they get now at Christmas, ye know? E lassies used tae get their frock for their Sunday school party, an their annual, or their comic - whatever comic they took, they got e annual o at - an maybe some sweeties an at. They were quite happy.'

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Purchasing Foodstuffs in Wick

CAITHNESS: Wick

1980s

mobile shops; grocery shops

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Life in Wick

In this audio extract, Mrs Baba Mackay talks about the milk being delivered in Wick. She also recalls other delivery vans including the grocer's, the butcher's and the fish van.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did ee used til get yer milk delivered by e milkman?<br /> <br /> Yes, Martin's milk, an Geordie Bain, e dairy in Dempster Street, used to come roond. We used tae take milk fae Martin's. Came til e door, a big urn on e back, a milk churn, I should say, on e back wi a tap on it an they measured oot yer pint in yer joug or yer pail, or whatever ye hid, and at's [?] went til e door for it. He put in e jug til ee <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An was at in a horse an cairt?<br /> <br /> Yes. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An can ye mind how much at used to cost?<br /> <br /> Oh it wasna much, aboot a penny, Ah think. I wouldna say, a penny or a penny-ha'penny for e pint o milk, ye know? Ye see, ye didna buy a lot o milk cos ye hedna a lot o pennies, an at was it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did there used tae be any vans that used tae come rood, or anything like at?<br /> <br /> Well, no when we were young cos they'd a shoppie, as I say, at every corner but then when we went up til Dunnet Avenue, when e new housing scheme started up ere, there was a Coop van at used til come fae Pulteney, ye know? We used til get messages fae e Coop van, it was right handy. Didnae hev til go til e street for things, ye know? An then there was a butcher van too, ye know, an a fish van came every week; Geordie Mackenzie's in Barrogill Street, used til get him every Thursday. But we never seemed tae want, ye know. If ye hed two or three shillings, ye could get fit ye wanted. It was up til yourself fit ye hed. An Ah always used tae say by e time at ee paid every chiel on Setterday nicht, ye hedna got buy e Sunday paper on Sunday, ee would rake in e bairns' banks til get for e Sunday paper. We was quite happy wi e whole o them. Ah mean e bairns, Ah always think, were very content. If ye hed a shilling, ye gave it til them, if ye hedna, ye hedna, and at's all. Ah mean, they didnae get big presents like they get now at Christmas, ye know? E lassies used tae get their frock for their Sunday school party, an their annual, or their comic - whatever comic they took, they got e annual o at - an maybe some sweeties an at. They were quite happy.'