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TITLE
Sweeties in the Good Old Days
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_109
PLACENAME
Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Baba Mackay
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
41390
KEYWORDS
childhood
growing up

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In this audio extract, Mrs Baba Mackay of Wick remembers aspects of childhood including favourite sweets and childhood games.

'Interviewer: An when ye we were little, ye know, for e sweeties an at, what kind o sweeties did ye used tae buy?

A ha'penny lucky tattie. Ye got what we called a lucky tattie. Two for a ha'penny, an there were a threepenny bit in wan in each box, ye know, so ye kept on buyan e lucky tatties til see who would get e threepenny bit, then when ye got e threepenny bit ye bought six or seven, or six, whitever it was, wi your threepenny bit an ye gave wan each then til yer pals, an we all ate them til see who would get e next threepenny bit, ye know. An e liquorice oot o Walter's e chemists, we used til put in a bottle wi watter, an shake it up, for makin a drink; it was a liquorice drink.

Interviewer: An what was in e inside o e other tatties?

There was nothing inside it. It was like a toffee, wi sort o cinnamon coverin on it. It wis jist like a lump a [gunday?] wi cinnamon on it, ye know? There were a threepenny bit in wan oot o e box. Ah don't know how many'd be in e box. I'd swear aboot maybe four dozen or so, ye know? An ye got wan oot o at box wi a threepenny bit in it an everybody got them [?].

Interviewer: An did ye play games at e school?

Yes, uh-huh. Skips an rounders an arrows, an whatnot else. An when we were bairns we used til hev arrows roond e square - eh - Huddart Street, Grant Street, Macrae Street, Kinnaird Street, an back. At was e arrows roond e square, at night, ye know? Well, a whilie efter tea-time when we got oot but we never wandered far from e door, ye know? Ma mother could find us in minutes. Ah mean, if she came oot an said where was ye, if ee's roond e square somebody told her where ye were, ye know? An we used tae play I-spy in e shop windows, spyin different things wi different initials, ye know? An at was wir fun. An if mother came oot an shouted 'Right, bedtime', ye went, no matter whit ye wis in e middle o, at was it. Ye niver said no. Ye went.

Interviewer: An how did ye play arrows?

Arrows was - ye put e arrows on e street, ye know, an they followed e arrows taesee where ye went. Ye'd maybe go in some entry, but ye wouldna put an arrow in e entry, an then they couldna find ye, ye know? It was just sorta - ye hed red herrin, I should say, ye put an arrow maybe in some entry an sometimes ye would get through from Grant Street or Kinnaird Street where ye missed at ither bit, then, ye see? They were still goan roond lookan for ye.

Interviewer: An did ye used til hev sports, games an at, at e school?

Yes, uh-huh. We hed sports as such in e Bignold Park at e end o e term, at e summer, e same as they do have now, ye know? Knitting - skipping, Ah should say, and races an things like at, ye know?

Interviewer: An did ye used tae be split up intae teams?

Yes. Uh-huh. Classes, different teams an different ages. Uh-huh. An e prizes was threepence an sixpence then, ye know? A lot o money. Ye got a threepenny bit, ye's pleased.'

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Sweeties in the Good Old Days

CAITHNESS: Wick

1980s

childhood; growing up

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Life in Wick

In this audio extract, Mrs Baba Mackay of Wick remembers aspects of childhood including favourite sweets and childhood games.<br /> <br /> 'Interviewer: An when ye we were little, ye know, for e sweeties an at, what kind o sweeties did ye used tae buy?<br /> <br /> A ha'penny lucky tattie. Ye got what we called a lucky tattie. Two for a ha'penny, an there were a threepenny bit in wan in each box, ye know, so ye kept on buyan e lucky tatties til see who would get e threepenny bit, then when ye got e threepenny bit ye bought six or seven, or six, whitever it was, wi your threepenny bit an ye gave wan each then til yer pals, an we all ate them til see who would get e next threepenny bit, ye know. An e liquorice oot o Walter's e chemists, we used til put in a bottle wi watter, an shake it up, for makin a drink; it was a liquorice drink. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An what was in e inside o e other tatties?<br /> <br /> There was nothing inside it. It was like a toffee, wi sort o cinnamon coverin on it. It wis jist like a lump a [gunday?] wi cinnamon on it, ye know? There were a threepenny bit in wan oot o e box. Ah don't know how many'd be in e box. I'd swear aboot maybe four dozen or so, ye know? An ye got wan oot o at box wi a threepenny bit in it an everybody got them [?].<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did ye play games at e school?<br /> <br /> Yes, uh-huh. Skips an rounders an arrows, an whatnot else. An when we were bairns we used til hev arrows roond e square - eh - Huddart Street, Grant Street, Macrae Street, Kinnaird Street, an back. At was e arrows roond e square, at night, ye know? Well, a whilie efter tea-time when we got oot but we never wandered far from e door, ye know? Ma mother could find us in minutes. Ah mean, if she came oot an said where was ye, if ee's roond e square somebody told her where ye were, ye know? An we used tae play I-spy in e shop windows, spyin different things wi different initials, ye know? An at was wir fun. An if mother came oot an shouted 'Right, bedtime', ye went, no matter whit ye wis in e middle o, at was it. Ye niver said no. Ye went. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An how did ye play arrows?<br /> <br /> Arrows was - ye put e arrows on e street, ye know, an they followed e arrows taesee where ye went. Ye'd maybe go in some entry, but ye wouldna put an arrow in e entry, an then they couldna find ye, ye know? It was just sorta - ye hed red herrin, I should say, ye put an arrow maybe in some entry an sometimes ye would get through from Grant Street or Kinnaird Street where ye missed at ither bit, then, ye see? They were still goan roond lookan for ye.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did ye used til hev sports, games an at, at e school?<br /> <br /> Yes, uh-huh. We hed sports as such in e Bignold Park at e end o e term, at e summer, e same as they do have now, ye know? Knitting - skipping, Ah should say, and races an things like at, ye know?<br /> <br /> Interviewer: An did ye used tae be split up intae teams?<br /> <br /> Yes. Uh-huh. Classes, different teams an different ages. Uh-huh. An e prizes was threepence an sixpence then, ye know? A lot o money. Ye got a threepenny bit, ye's pleased.'