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TITLE
Work and Married Life in John O'Groats
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_111
PLACENAME
John o' Groats
DISTRICT
Northern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Canisbay
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
Ruby Doull
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
41391
KEYWORDS
medical care
midwifery
family life

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In this aduio extract, Ruby Doull from Wick remembers her time spent as a laundry worker in the John O'Groat laundry. She also talks about her large family. She had thirteen in the days before the NHS when the midwife and doctor had to be paid.

'Ah left e school, dear, when Ah was fourteen an Ah wasna two weeks left e school when Ah got intil e John o'Groat Laundry. Ah mind on at.

Interviewer: An what was yer job in e John O'Groat Laundry? What did ye do?

Ah was a checker. Checkan out the clothes an parcels, ye know, an - Checkan, pittan them all in different places. Ah was ere for eight years.

Interveiwer: An what hours did ye work?

Oh, til nine o'clock at night. Workan til nine. We were eight o'clock in e morning til nine. At's when e sporties came up. There were sporties at came up here [?] but it wis all e beeg hooses like Banniskirk House an Sandside, Reay, an all ower e country there's beeg, beeg - an e sporties came up til shoot, ye know, e grouse an at. They came up then, there was a lot - we hed at much work til do. We hed til work [til] nine o'clock at nicht. Fae eight in e morning til nine.

Interviewer: An what was yer wages?

E first wage Ah got fae e landlord ma mother kept it. Ee know what it was? Twelve shillings and sixpence. Now, fit's at e day? Twelve shillings and sixpence.

Interviewer: An how many o a family did ye have?

Thirteen. Ah'm tellan ee. I had thirteen. I'd twelve of a family in the house. Through there. Some o them in 10 Bridge Street. An when Ah had William, Ah'm tellan ee, Ah hed til go til e nursing home, cos I was forty-three, an it was e doctor, Rugg, ye know, e wumman doctor at - she put me ere. Cos Dr Macrae was on his holidays, or something - Ah canna mind. Ah know Ah was once in e nursing home an at wis all. Ah hid em all in the house wi poor Liz Warse. Liz Warse was her name, a wifie, a midwife, at came. Ah hed her an she used til come up, an first she went - used'll go til me an then she used til go ower e road til - mind Magdelina? She'd go til Lena an all. She would come in here through e night, through e day, any time ye hed yer bairn, an we hed til pay. We hed til pay, but Ah just canna mind how much. But we hed til pay e doctor.'

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Work and Married Life in John O'Groats

CAITHNESS: Canisbay

1980s

medical care; midwifery; family life

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Miscellaneous

In this aduio extract, Ruby Doull from Wick remembers her time spent as a laundry worker in the John O'Groat laundry. She also talks about her large family. She had thirteen in the days before the NHS when the midwife and doctor had to be paid.<br /> <br /> 'Ah left e school, dear, when Ah was fourteen an Ah wasna two weeks left e school when Ah got intil e John o'Groat Laundry. Ah mind on at. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An what was yer job in e John O'Groat Laundry? What did ye do?<br /> <br /> Ah was a checker. Checkan out the clothes an parcels, ye know, an - Checkan, pittan them all in different places. Ah was ere for eight years.<br /> <br /> Interveiwer: An what hours did ye work?<br /> <br /> Oh, til nine o'clock at night. Workan til nine. We were eight o'clock in e morning til nine. At's when e sporties came up. There were sporties at came up here [?] but it wis all e beeg hooses like Banniskirk House an Sandside, Reay, an all ower e country there's beeg, beeg - an e sporties came up til shoot, ye know, e grouse an at. They came up then, there was a lot - we hed at much work til do. We hed til work [til] nine o'clock at nicht. Fae eight in e morning til nine. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An what was yer wages?<br /> <br /> E first wage Ah got fae e landlord ma mother kept it. Ee know what it was? Twelve shillings and sixpence. Now, fit's at e day? Twelve shillings and sixpence. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: An how many o a family did ye have?<br /> <br /> Thirteen. Ah'm tellan ee. I had thirteen. I'd twelve of a family in the house. Through there. Some o them in 10 Bridge Street. An when Ah had William, Ah'm tellan ee, Ah hed til go til e nursing home, cos I was forty-three, an it was e doctor, Rugg, ye know, e wumman doctor at - she put me ere. Cos Dr Macrae was on his holidays, or something - Ah canna mind. Ah know Ah was once in e nursing home an at wis all. Ah hid em all in the house wi poor Liz Warse. Liz Warse was her name, a wifie, a midwife, at came. Ah hed her an she used til come up, an first she went - used'll go til me an then she used til go ower e road til - mind Magdelina? She'd go til Lena an all. She would come in here through e night, through e day, any time ye hed yer bairn, an we hed til pay. We hed til pay, but Ah just canna mind how much. But we hed til pay e doctor.'