Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Harvesting Techniques in Caithness (3 of 4)
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_162
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
George Sutherland
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
41437
KEYWORDS
crofting
crofters
crofter
croft
crofts
thrashing
binding
harvest
harvesting
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Caithness resident, Mr George Sutherland, was born in 1907 into a crofting or farming environment.

In this audio extract from the 1980s, he describes how sheaves of corn were built into scroos. Wet corn was built first in small scroos called hand-scroos in the field, but dry sheaves were carefully built in large structures like circular stacks, ten feet in diameter, with conical tops. The base diameter was measured by a five-foot mark on the handle of the fork.

These scroos were watertight and needed skill in building. The finished scroo was covered in netting to help hold it together in high winds. Corn could be kept for many months in this way, and threshed as required during the winter.

[full transcription to follow soon]

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Harvesting Techniques in Caithness (3 of 4)

CAITHNESS

1980s

crofting; crofters; crofter; croft; crofts; thrashing; binding; harvest; harvesting; audio

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Crofting & Farming

Caithness resident, Mr George Sutherland, was born in 1907 into a crofting or farming environment.<br /> <br /> In this audio extract from the 1980s, he describes how sheaves of corn were built into scroos. Wet corn was built first in small scroos called hand-scroos in the field, but dry sheaves were carefully built in large structures like circular stacks, ten feet in diameter, with conical tops. The base diameter was measured by a five-foot mark on the handle of the fork.<br /> <br /> These scroos were watertight and needed skill in building. The finished scroo was covered in netting to help hold it together in high winds. Corn could be kept for many months in this way, and threshed as required during the winter.<br /> <br /> [full transcription to follow soon]