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TITLE
Balavil Sport Hotel, Newtonmore
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0052_AT
PLACENAME
Newtonmore
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
DATE OF IMAGE
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Andrew Taylor
SOURCE
Andrew Taylor
ASSET ID
41615
KEYWORDS
hotels
Balavil Sport Hotel, Newtonmore

This photograph shows Main Street and the Balavil Hotel, Newtonmore. W.L. Carruthers designed the frontage of the Balavil Hotel in 1900, which is now known as the Balavil Sports Hotel.

Situated in the southern end of Badenoch and Strathspey on the upper reaches of the Spey there is no record of a village at Newtonmore before the beginning of the 19th century. There is evidence of prehistoric settlements and early townships in nearby Glen Banchor. It was not until after the building of a bridge over the Spey in 1756 and the clearances at the end of the eighteenth century that a settlement was built on the new north road. According to the Third Statistical Account the village was founded by James Macpherson, son of the James Macpherson who "translated" the poems of Ossian.

Originally called Stonemuir the name was changed in 1828 to Newtownmore - the town on the moor. At the beginning of the 19th century the biggest cattlemakets between Inverness and Falkirk were held here. With Queen Victoria's interest in the Highlands, she had visited and even considered buying nearby Ardverikie, Newtonmore grew as a holiday resort, the large estates providing hunting, shooting and fishing for the gentry.

At 800ft above sea level, sheltered from north winds by the Monadhliadh Mountains and protected by the Grampians and the Cairngorms this quiet, traditional village is reckoned to be the most inwardly point in Scotland, equidistant from the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea and is one of the driest parts of the country. The climate has made it a popular health resort and in recent years it has been a central location for the BBC television series "Monarch of the Glen".

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Balavil Sport Hotel, Newtonmore

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

2000s

hotels

Andrew Taylor

This photograph shows Main Street and the Balavil Hotel, Newtonmore. W.L. Carruthers designed the frontage of the Balavil Hotel in 1900, which is now known as the Balavil Sports Hotel.<br /> <br /> Situated in the southern end of Badenoch and Strathspey on the upper reaches of the Spey there is no record of a village at Newtonmore before the beginning of the 19th century. There is evidence of prehistoric settlements and early townships in nearby Glen Banchor. It was not until after the building of a bridge over the Spey in 1756 and the clearances at the end of the eighteenth century that a settlement was built on the new north road. According to the Third Statistical Account the village was founded by James Macpherson, son of the James Macpherson who "translated" the poems of Ossian. <br /> <br /> Originally called Stonemuir the name was changed in 1828 to Newtownmore - the town on the moor. At the beginning of the 19th century the biggest cattlemakets between Inverness and Falkirk were held here. With Queen Victoria's interest in the Highlands, she had visited and even considered buying nearby Ardverikie, Newtonmore grew as a holiday resort, the large estates providing hunting, shooting and fishing for the gentry. <br /> <br /> At 800ft above sea level, sheltered from north winds by the Monadhliadh Mountains and protected by the Grampians and the Cairngorms this quiet, traditional village is reckoned to be the most inwardly point in Scotland, equidistant from the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea and is one of the driest parts of the country. The climate has made it a popular health resort and in recent years it has been a central location for the BBC television series "Monarch of the Glen".