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TITLE
The Pavilion, Strathpeffer
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_1113_AT
PLACENAME
Strathpeffer
DISTRICT
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Fodderty
DATE OF IMAGE
2008
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Andrew Taylor
SOURCE
Andrew Taylor
ASSET ID
41620
KEYWORDS
entertainment
buildings
architecture
The Pavilion, Strathpeffer

Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'.

As the popularity of Strathpeffer grew, the need for a suitable meeting place was recognised. The Countess of Cromartie commissioned a local architect to design a building based on the casino at Baden Baden, which in turn was based on the Festspielhaus at Bayreuth. The resulting building was a grand Victorian Pavilion within a pleasure garden next to the Upper Pump Room. The total cost of the Pavilion was just over £2,700 and it was opened by the Countess of Sutherland on 10 August 1881.

During World War I the Pavilion was used as an American naval hospital. The popularity of Strathpeffer declined between the two world wars and the Pavilion gradually fell out of use. It was recently restored by the Scottish Historic Buildings Trust and is now managed by the Strathpeffer Pavilion Association as a venue for concerts, weddings, conferences and exhibitions.

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The Pavilion, Strathpeffer

ROSS: Fodderty

2000s

entertainment; buildings; architecture

Andrew Taylor

Strathpeffer lies 4 miles (6 km) west of Dingwall in the strath of the River Peffery. It owes its growth and popularity to the discovery of sulphurous springs there in the 1770s. With the strong support of the then Countess of Cromartie, the village developed as a Victorian spa resort, its popularity greatly enhanced by the opening of the Strathpeffer branch of the Dingwall and Skye Railway in 1885. Many grand hotels and substantial Victorian villas were built to accommodate the steady stream of visitors who came to 'take the waters'.<br /> <br /> As the popularity of Strathpeffer grew, the need for a suitable meeting place was recognised. The Countess of Cromartie commissioned a local architect to design a building based on the casino at Baden Baden, which in turn was based on the Festspielhaus at Bayreuth. The resulting building was a grand Victorian Pavilion within a pleasure garden next to the Upper Pump Room. The total cost of the Pavilion was just over £2,700 and it was opened by the Countess of Sutherland on 10 August 1881.<br /> <br /> During World War I the Pavilion was used as an American naval hospital. The popularity of Strathpeffer declined between the two world wars and the Pavilion gradually fell out of use. It was recently restored by the Scottish Historic Buildings Trust and is now managed by the Strathpeffer Pavilion Association as a venue for concerts, weddings, conferences and exhibitions.