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TITLE
Barn with Wattle Panel, Dornie
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_HF_3_29_25
PLACENAME
Kirkton
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1970s
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
42037
KEYWORDS
barns
agricultural buildings
architecture
Barn with Wattle Panel, Dornie

This barn in Kirkton is a good example of what was the common style of agricultural barn built in the area over several centuries. Several other examples survive to this day. The design provides protection from the wet and windy climate of the west coast.

The cruck-frame construction of non-loadbearing walls with wattled or louvered panels allows air to pass freely through the building, providing good ventilation and drying. The gable ends were constructed of stakes originally interwoven with brush and broom, and now more commonly with willow, providing further circulation of air. The roof was generally made of thatched heather.

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Barn with Wattle Panel, Dornie

ROSS: Lochalsh

1970s

barns; agricultural buildings; architecture

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum Photographic Collection

This barn in Kirkton is a good example of what was the common style of agricultural barn built in the area over several centuries. Several other examples survive to this day. The design provides protection from the wet and windy climate of the west coast.<br /> <br /> The cruck-frame construction of non-loadbearing walls with wattled or louvered panels allows air to pass freely through the building, providing good ventilation and drying. The gable ends were constructed of stakes originally interwoven with brush and broom, and now more commonly with willow, providing further circulation of air. The roof was generally made of thatched heather.