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TITLE
Kingussie Boy Scouts 1st Camp, 1910
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_HF_8_20_001
PLACENAME
Croftcarnoch
DISTRICT
Badenoch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
DATE OF IMAGE
July 1910
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
42385
KEYWORDS
scouting
boy scouts
scouting movement
youth organisations
camping
Kingussie Boy Scouts 1st Camp, 1910

Kingussie Boy Scouts were formed in September 1909, under the janitor of the local school, Mr A. M. Macintyre, who had served in the army as a corporal in F Company, 4th Camerons. About 40 boys were enrolled at the start. Their activities are recorded in the pages of the Kingussie Record (later the Badenoch Record), which mentions route marches, and activities in the hills surrounding the town. Their first camp was at Croftcarnoch (between Kingussie and Kincraig) in July 1910, using borrowed tents. The return to Kingussie after the camp was headed by the Kingussie Pipe Band. The following Sunday, the Troop paraded to the Parish Church, where the minister, Rev. D. Macfarlane, was taking a great interest in the Troop, and soon became their chaplain. The following year (1911), the camp was also at Croftcarnoch.

The Troop was founded some two and half years after Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting, published the book Scouting for Boys, but it was not the earliest Troop in the Highlands as Troops existed in Inverness and Nairn from certainly the summer of 1908. Several other photographs of their early activities have been donated to the Inverness District Scout Council Archive, including one taken at Cluny Castle by the wife of Cluny Macpherson in October 1912. A photograph also survives from a newspaper of the Troop attending the 1911 Boy Scout Rally held in the Northern Meeting Park in Inverness, which was attended by Baden-Powell.


The Kingussie Troop was one of the few that survived the First World War, although under temporary leadership. Mr Macintyre resumed leadership after the War, but the Troop seems to have ceased to operate around the end of 1920. It was revived by George Dingwall in 1935, and this Troop ran through until 1962. It was then revived for a period in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and again from 1985 until 1999. For many years after the Second World War the Troop owned a hut which had started life as one of the huts at the War-time Glenfeshie camp under the control of Lord Rowallan, who became Chief Scout. He visited the hut in 1949.

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Kingussie Boy Scouts 1st Camp, 1910

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

1910s

scouting; boy scouts; scouting movement; youth organisations; camping

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum Photographic Collection

Kingussie Boy Scouts were formed in September 1909, under the janitor of the local school, Mr A. M. Macintyre, who had served in the army as a corporal in F Company, 4th Camerons. About 40 boys were enrolled at the start. Their activities are recorded in the pages of the Kingussie Record (later the Badenoch Record), which mentions route marches, and activities in the hills surrounding the town. Their first camp was at Croftcarnoch (between Kingussie and Kincraig) in July 1910, using borrowed tents. The return to Kingussie after the camp was headed by the Kingussie Pipe Band. The following Sunday, the Troop paraded to the Parish Church, where the minister, Rev. D. Macfarlane, was taking a great interest in the Troop, and soon became their chaplain. The following year (1911), the camp was also at Croftcarnoch.<br /> <br /> The Troop was founded some two and half years after Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting, published the book Scouting for Boys, but it was not the earliest Troop in the Highlands as Troops existed in Inverness and Nairn from certainly the summer of 1908. Several other photographs of their early activities have been donated to the Inverness District Scout Council Archive, including one taken at Cluny Castle by the wife of Cluny Macpherson in October 1912. A photograph also survives from a newspaper of the Troop attending the 1911 Boy Scout Rally held in the Northern Meeting Park in Inverness, which was attended by Baden-Powell.<br /> <br /> <br /> The Kingussie Troop was one of the few that survived the First World War, although under temporary leadership. Mr Macintyre resumed leadership after the War, but the Troop seems to have ceased to operate around the end of 1920. It was revived by George Dingwall in 1935, and this Troop ran through until 1962. It was then revived for a period in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and again from 1985 until 1999. For many years after the Second World War the Troop owned a hut which had started life as one of the huts at the War-time Glenfeshie camp under the control of Lord Rowallan, who became Chief Scout. He visited the hut in 1949.