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TITLE
Struan, Isle of Skye
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_HF_13_003_017
PLACENAME
Struan
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
42577
KEYWORDS
houses
architecture
Struan, Isle of Skye

This photograph was a postcard scene titled 'Looking East, Struan'. The postcard was published by Raphael Tuck and Sons, Ltd, London.

The unusual design of two separate, but very similar, houses built together probably caught the photographer's eye. Generally, houses of this size and design were single, detached dwellings. Both started as single story houses, with the upstairs added some time later. The exterior features, of whitewashed and stone frontages, of different window designs and placement, make for very individual dwellings. Both houses were built and are still occupied by MacKinnon families. The house on the left is called Craiglea, and on the right, Craigaird.



Struan is a small village on the west coast of Skye on the shores of Loch Beag, the inlet opening to the larger Loch Harport. Traditionally a crofting and fishing community, tourism now adds to the local economy.



To the north of this photograph is the Iron Age broch, Dun Beag, one of the best preserved brochs on the Isle of Skye. Finds from the site include glass beads, coins, pottery and a gold ring. Nearby in the local cemetery are buried the famous Cuillin climber J Norman Collie, and his friend and Skye guide, John MacKenzie.

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Struan, Isle of Skye

INVERNESS: Bracadale

1920s

houses; architecture

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum Photographic Collection

This photograph was a postcard scene titled 'Looking East, Struan'. The postcard was published by Raphael Tuck and Sons, Ltd, London. <br /> <br /> The unusual design of two separate, but very similar, houses built together probably caught the photographer's eye. Generally, houses of this size and design were single, detached dwellings. Both started as single story houses, with the upstairs added some time later. The exterior features, of whitewashed and stone frontages, of different window designs and placement, make for very individual dwellings. Both houses were built and are still occupied by MacKinnon families. The house on the left is called Craiglea, and on the right, Craigaird. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Struan is a small village on the west coast of Skye on the shores of Loch Beag, the inlet opening to the larger Loch Harport. Traditionally a crofting and fishing community, tourism now adds to the local economy.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> To the north of this photograph is the Iron Age broch, Dun Beag, one of the best preserved brochs on the Isle of Skye. Finds from the site include glass beads, coins, pottery and a gold ring. Nearby in the local cemetery are buried the famous Cuillin climber J Norman Collie, and his friend and Skye guide, John MacKenzie.