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TITLE
Display of farming and dairy equipment at 'Am Fasgadh', Iona
EXTERNAL ID
KIGHF_IF_GRANT_08
PLACENAME
Iona
DISTRICT
Mull
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Kilfinchen and Kilvickeon
CREATOR
I F Grant
SOURCE
Highland Folk Museum
ASSET ID
42676
KEYWORDS
highland life, croft houses
buildings
museums
exhibitions
Display of farming and dairy equipment at 'Am Fasgadh', Iona

This display of farming and dairy equipment includes a horse collar, creel, butter churns and wooden buckets. It was part of Dr. I. F. Grant's museum collection displayed at 'Am Fasgadh' (the Shelter), at an old Free Church building on Iona. Dr. Grant moved her growing collection there in 1936. This display has been recreated today at the Highland Folk Museum at Kingussie.

Although born in Edinburgh and brought up in London, Isabel Frances Grant was 'first and foremost a Highlander, with a strong sense of belonging in the north country and in particular to the Grant country of Strathspey. She was justifiably proud of her family and their long domicile in the Highlands as the Grants of Tullochgorm' (Hugh Cheape, 2007).

Her interest in Highland life and culture shaped her writing and the museum she founded. Originally known as Am Fasgadh, (the Shelter), her collection and vision form the basis of what exists as the Highland Folk Museum today.

Well versed in Scottish history and Highland folk culture, Isabel Grant wrote her first book 'Everyday Life of an Old Highland Farm' in 1924, based upon the eighteenth-century account books of a distant ancestor, William Mackintosh of Balnespick, near Kingussie.

Travelling through Europe, she was profoundly influenced by the open air museum movement and in 1934 she determined to follow by establishing a Highland folk museum. She resolved to record as much as she could of the quickly disappearing ways of Highland life as well as preserve many of its associated objects.

In parallel to her collecting activities, Isabel Grant continued writing and publishing. Her seminal work, 'Highland Folk Ways' (1961) detailed the material and non-material culture of the Highlands, primarily illustrating the former using the collections she had established herself. She was awarded an honorary doctorate in 1948 by The University of Edinburgh and an MBE in 1959 for her contributions to scholarship.

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Display of farming and dairy equipment at 'Am Fasgadh', Iona

ARGYLL: Kilfinchen and Kilvickeon

highland life, croft houses; buildings; museums; exhibitions

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum Photographic Collection

This display of farming and dairy equipment includes a horse collar, creel, butter churns and wooden buckets. It was part of Dr. I. F. Grant's museum collection displayed at 'Am Fasgadh' (the Shelter), at an old Free Church building on Iona. Dr. Grant moved her growing collection there in 1936. This display has been recreated today at the Highland Folk Museum at Kingussie.<br /> <br /> Although born in Edinburgh and brought up in London, Isabel Frances Grant was 'first and foremost a Highlander, with a strong sense of belonging in the north country and in particular to the Grant country of Strathspey. She was justifiably proud of her family and their long domicile in the Highlands as the Grants of Tullochgorm' (Hugh Cheape, 2007). <br /> <br /> Her interest in Highland life and culture shaped her writing and the museum she founded. Originally known as Am Fasgadh, (the Shelter), her collection and vision form the basis of what exists as the Highland Folk Museum today. <br /> <br /> Well versed in Scottish history and Highland folk culture, Isabel Grant wrote her first book 'Everyday Life of an Old Highland Farm' in 1924, based upon the eighteenth-century account books of a distant ancestor, William Mackintosh of Balnespick, near Kingussie. <br /> <br /> Travelling through Europe, she was profoundly influenced by the open air museum movement and in 1934 she determined to follow by establishing a Highland folk museum. She resolved to record as much as she could of the quickly disappearing ways of Highland life as well as preserve many of its associated objects.<br /> <br /> In parallel to her collecting activities, Isabel Grant continued writing and publishing. Her seminal work, 'Highland Folk Ways' (1961) detailed the material and non-material culture of the Highlands, primarily illustrating the former using the collections she had established herself. She was awarded an honorary doctorate in 1948 by The University of Edinburgh and an MBE in 1959 for her contributions to scholarship.