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TITLE
A.T.F. Fraser of Abertarff
EXTERNAL ID
AB_INVTOWNHOUSE07_53
PLACENAME
Inverness
PERIOD
1820s
CREATOR
Thomson of Duddingston
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
428
KEYWORDS
Inverness Town House
Frasers
Simon Fraser
Jacobites
Lord Lovat
estates
forfeited estates
A.T.F. Fraser of Abertarff

This portrait of A. T. F. Fraser of Abertarff, by Thomson of Duddingston, hangs in Inverness Town House, in the Council Chamber. It is thought to have been painted in the 1820s.

Archibald Thomas Frederick Fraser was the illegitimate son of John Fraser, one of five sons of Archibald Campbell Fraser, half-brother of General Fraser, elder son of Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat.

The estates of Lord Lovat were forfeited after the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. The estates, but not the title, were restored to General Fraser for his services with General Wolfe at Quebec.

General Fraser's half-brother succeeded to the ancestral estates. Archibald lived to be a very old man. His five sons died before him without a legitimate heir. It was, therefore, the illegitimate grandson Archibald Thomas Frederick Fraser, known as Fraser of Abertarff, who inherited.

Abertarff, himself, died in 1884 without a male heir and the land passed to Fraser of Strichen who was next in line and who already had the right to the title of Lord Lovat. The title was officially restored to him by an Act of Parliament in 1857.

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A.T.F. Fraser of Abertarff

1820s

Inverness Town House; Frasers; Simon Fraser; Jacobites; Lord Lovat; estates; forfeited estates;

Am Baile

Inverness Town House 2007

This portrait of A. T. F. Fraser of Abertarff, by Thomson of Duddingston, hangs in Inverness Town House, in the Council Chamber. It is thought to have been painted in the 1820s.<br /> <br /> Archibald Thomas Frederick Fraser was the illegitimate son of John Fraser, one of five sons of Archibald Campbell Fraser, half-brother of General Fraser, elder son of Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat.<br /> <br /> The estates of Lord Lovat were forfeited after the Jacobite rebellion of 1745. The estates, but not the title, were restored to General Fraser for his services with General Wolfe at Quebec. <br /> <br /> General Fraser's half-brother succeeded to the ancestral estates. Archibald lived to be a very old man. His five sons died before him without a legitimate heir. It was, therefore, the illegitimate grandson Archibald Thomas Frederick Fraser, known as Fraser of Abertarff, who inherited.<br /> <br /> Abertarff, himself, died in 1884 without a male heir and the land passed to Fraser of Strichen who was next in line and who already had the right to the title of Lord Lovat. The title was officially restored to him by an Act of Parliament in 1857.