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TITLE
Inverness Town House - Wooden Panel 1
EXTERNAL ID
AB_INVTOWNHOUSE07_64
PLACENAME
Inverness
PERIOD
1680s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
439
KEYWORDS
Inverness Town House
Coat of Arms
Arms
crests
mottos
heraldry
masons
Friary
Dominicans
Inverness Town House - Wooden Panel 1

This wooden panel, one of two, hangs in Inverness Town House, on the staircase. It is thought to date from 1686 as the other panel has the Coat of Arms of Charles II on the front and '86' on the reverse.

The panel bears the earliest representation of the Coat of Arms of the Burgh of Inverness, a dromedary on a red shield supported by two elephants. The crest is a cornucopia (a horn) filled with flowers and the motto is 'Concordia et Fidelitas' (Concord and Fidelity).

The dromedary and the elephant are thought to represent the town's extensive mediaeval trade with the East.

In 1683 James Smith, a Master Mason from Edinburgh, was commissioned to cut the Arms in a stone for the bridge then being built. He was given the description of 'Our Saviour on the Cross supported by a dromedary on the dexter and an elephant on the sinister'. Three years later, although he had cut the stone, he was instructed to carve another with a dromedary on the shield supported by two elephants, as on the panel. Either the Council were not sure of the Arms or possibly did not want to be seen to be supporting Roman Catholicism. The religious policies of the Roman Catholic King James II and VII were not popular. He was finally deposed in 1688 and replaced by Protestants William and Mary. In the end the original stone, which bears the date 1686, was used and it is now built in to the west wall of the Town House. The motto is reversed, 'Fidelitas et Concordia'.

The Crucifix is taken from the first Inverness Burgh seal. Its origin is a seal from a Dominican Friary which was in Inverness from 1233 until the Reformation. All that remains of the Friary is the old burial ground.

The Coat of Arms was finally matriculated in 1900. It was in use until 1975 when the burgh became part of Inverness District.

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Inverness Town House - Wooden Panel 1

1680s

Inverness Town House; Coat of Arms; Arms; crests; mottos; heraldry; masons; Friary; Dominicans

Am Baile

Inverness Town House 2007

This wooden panel, one of two, hangs in Inverness Town House, on the staircase. It is thought to date from 1686 as the other panel has the Coat of Arms of Charles II on the front and '86' on the reverse.<br /> <br /> The panel bears the earliest representation of the Coat of Arms of the Burgh of Inverness, a dromedary on a red shield supported by two elephants. The crest is a cornucopia (a horn) filled with flowers and the motto is 'Concordia et Fidelitas' (Concord and Fidelity).<br /> <br /> The dromedary and the elephant are thought to represent the town's extensive mediaeval trade with the East.<br /> <br /> In 1683 James Smith, a Master Mason from Edinburgh, was commissioned to cut the Arms in a stone for the bridge then being built. He was given the description of 'Our Saviour on the Cross supported by a dromedary on the dexter and an elephant on the sinister'. Three years later, although he had cut the stone, he was instructed to carve another with a dromedary on the shield supported by two elephants, as on the panel. Either the Council were not sure of the Arms or possibly did not want to be seen to be supporting Roman Catholicism. The religious policies of the Roman Catholic King James II and VII were not popular. He was finally deposed in 1688 and replaced by Protestants William and Mary. In the end the original stone, which bears the date 1686, was used and it is now built in to the west wall of the Town House. The motto is reversed, 'Fidelitas et Concordia'.<br /> <br /> The Crucifix is taken from the first Inverness Burgh seal. Its origin is a seal from a Dominican Friary which was in Inverness from 1233 until the Reformation. All that remains of the Friary is the old burial ground.<br /> <br /> The Coat of Arms was finally matriculated in 1900. It was in use until 1975 when the burgh became part of Inverness District.