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TITLE
Corrienessan, Strathmore
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_BRIDGET_MACKENZIE_PHOTO_01
PLACENAME
Corrienessan
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Bridget Mackenzie
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
469
KEYWORDS
corries
Corrienessan, Strathmore

'Corrienessan, the Corrie of the Waterfalls, is a high hanging corrie on the south side of the broad strath known as the Corrienessan strath, due west of Gobernuisgach Lodge, in Strathmore, Sutherland.

A track leads west to the Bealach na Feithe, the Pass of the Stags, and from there down to the house called Lon, on Loch Stack. This track traverses the northern slope of the strath, and about halfway along the length of it, the path is opposite the mouth of the corrie. The corrie is some two to three hundred feet above the path, with a burn falling over its lip to form the waterfall. In wet weather there are several falls, hence the name Corrienessan.'

The above text is from Bridget Mackenzie's 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland' (1998).

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Corrienessan, Strathmore

SUTHERLAND: Durness

2000s

corries

Am Baile

'Corrienessan, the Corrie of the Waterfalls, is a high hanging corrie on the south side of the broad strath known as the Corrienessan strath, due west of Gobernuisgach Lodge, in Strathmore, Sutherland.<br /> <br /> A track leads west to the Bealach na Feithe, the Pass of the Stags, and from there down to the house called Lon, on Loch Stack. This track traverses the northern slope of the strath, and about halfway along the length of it, the path is opposite the mouth of the corrie. The corrie is some two to three hundred feet above the path, with a burn falling over its lip to form the waterfall. In wet weather there are several falls, hence the name Corrienessan.'<br /> <br /> The above text is from Bridget Mackenzie's 'Piping Traditions of the North of Scotland' (1998).