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Letter from Hugh Rose, Kilravock Castle to William Baillie, Bombay, page 2

The Baillies of Dunain were an Inverness family who lived in and around the area from the mid-15th century onwards. Although their estate was small in comparison with many of the principal Highland families, they occupied a niche in the upper levels of Highland society.

A substantial collection of the family's papers is held by The Highland Council Archive Service. The papers cover the period c.1760-1860.

This document is dated 1 November 1813. It is a letter from Hugh Rose of Kilravock Castle to William Baillie in Bombay. (Hugh Rose married Katherine Baillie, William's sister.)

In the letter Hugh talks about William's recent move from Bagdad to Bombay. (William was an army officer with the East India Company). Communications from Bombay should be better than from Bagdad and Hugh expresses his satisfaction over this fact.

Hugh goes on to mention that he has recently been elected MP for Nairnshire. One of the current Parliamentary issues he comments upon is the Catholic Bill. Catholics were given the vote in 1793 but they were still unable to become MPs.

As well as discussing local news and family matters, Hugh also talks about the local militia force whose numbers have been greatly reduced. The militia had originated towards the end of the 18th century when fear of revolution and war with France resulted in Scots organising themselves into part-time volunteer units. Eventually the government felt it was not enough to rely on volunteers and created a Scottish nationwide militia force in 1797. By this act the militia was required to protect the nation at home in times of threat. Each county was required to have a set number of men in the force. The volunteers had to do annual training and were given a bounty. Their services were often called upon, especially during periods of war


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Letter from Hugh Rose, Kilravock Castle to William Baillie, Bombay, page 2

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1810s

Baillies of Dunain; letters; Kilravock Castle; Roses of Kilravock; William Baillie; East India Company; communications; Catholic Bill; militia; Hugh Rose; Katherine Baillie; Highland Archive; landowners; correspondence; letters

Highland Archive Centre

Baillie of Dunain family papers

The Baillies of Dunain were an Inverness family who lived in and around the area from the mid-15th century onwards. Although their estate was small in comparison with many of the principal Highland families, they occupied a niche in the upper levels of Highland society.<br /> <br /> A substantial collection of the family's papers is held by The Highland Council Archive Service. The papers cover the period c.1760-1860.<br /> <br /> This document is dated 1 November 1813. It is a letter from Hugh Rose of Kilravock Castle to William Baillie in Bombay. (Hugh Rose married Katherine Baillie, William's sister.)<br /> <br /> In the letter Hugh talks about William's recent move from Bagdad to Bombay. (William was an army officer with the East India Company). Communications from Bombay should be better than from Bagdad and Hugh expresses his satisfaction over this fact. <br /> <br /> Hugh goes on to mention that he has recently been elected MP for Nairnshire. One of the current Parliamentary issues he comments upon is the Catholic Bill. Catholics were given the vote in 1793 but they were still unable to become MPs. <br /> <br /> As well as discussing local news and family matters, Hugh also talks about the local militia force whose numbers have been greatly reduced. The militia had originated towards the end of the 18th century when fear of revolution and war with France resulted in Scots organising themselves into part-time volunteer units. Eventually the government felt it was not enough to rely on volunteers and created a Scottish nationwide militia force in 1797. By this act the militia was required to protect the nation at home in times of threat. Each county was required to have a set number of men in the force. The volunteers had to do annual training and were given a bounty. Their services were often called upon, especially during periods of war <br /> <br /> <br /> For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please <a href="mailto: archives@highlifehighland.com">email</a> the Highland Archive Service