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TITLE
Statistical information on Loyal Inverness Fencible Regiment of Infantry, page 1
EXTERNAL ID
Z_GB232_D456_B_12_2_1
PLACENAME
Dunain
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1796
PERIOD
1790s
SOURCE
Highland Archive Centre
ASSET ID
5108
KEYWORDS
Baillies of Dunain
Highland Archive
Colonel John Baillie
militias
fencibles
Inverness Fencibles
arms
weapons
East India Company
correspondence
letters
Statistical information on Loyal Inverness Fencible Regiment of Infantry, page 1

The Baillies of Dunain were an Inverness family who lived in and around the area from the mid-15th century onwards. Although their estate was small in comparison with many of the principal Highland families, they occupied a niche in the upper levels of Highland society.

A substantial collection of the family's papers is held by The Highland Council Archive Service. The papers cover the period c.1760-1860.

This document is dated 27 July 1796. It contains information on the Loyal Inverness Fencible Regiment of Infantry, a local militia group commanded, at that time, by Colonel John Baillie. The Colonel had previously served as an army officer in the East India Company.

The first part of the document is a table showing the receipt of arms, accoutrements and clothing delivered from the regimental store to the various 'Companies' within the regiment. Some of the items mentioned are pikes, fuzees, slings, caps, swords, rosettes, kilts, and tommy hawks.

The second table is the store's records of stock, showing where each item was delivered and how many items remain in the store. It also includes a smaller table of items lost by the companies.

Militias had originated towards the end of the 18th century when fear of revolution and war with France resulted in Scots organising themselves into part-time volunteer units. Eventually the government felt it was not enough to rely on volunteers and created a Scottish nationwide militia force in 1797. By this act the militia was required to protect the nation at home in times of threat. Each county was required to have a set number of men in the force. The volunteers had to do annual training and were given a bounty. Their services were often called upon, especially during periods of war


For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please email the Highland Archive Service

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Statistical information on Loyal Inverness Fencible Regiment of Infantry, page 1

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1790s

Baillies of Dunain; Highland Archive; Colonel John Baillie; militias; fencibles; Inverness Fencibles; arms; weapons; East India Company; correspondence; letters

Highland Archive Centre

Baillie of Dunain family papers

The Baillies of Dunain were an Inverness family who lived in and around the area from the mid-15th century onwards. Although their estate was small in comparison with many of the principal Highland families, they occupied a niche in the upper levels of Highland society.<br /> <br /> A substantial collection of the family's papers is held by The Highland Council Archive Service. The papers cover the period c.1760-1860.<br /> <br /> This document is dated 27 July 1796. It contains information on the Loyal Inverness Fencible Regiment of Infantry, a local militia group commanded, at that time, by Colonel John Baillie. The Colonel had previously served as an army officer in the East India Company.<br /> <br /> The first part of the document is a table showing the receipt of arms, accoutrements and clothing delivered from the regimental store to the various 'Companies' within the regiment. Some of the items mentioned are pikes, fuzees, slings, caps, swords, rosettes, kilts, and tommy hawks.<br /> <br /> The second table is the store's records of stock, showing where each item was delivered and how many items remain in the store. It also includes a smaller table of items lost by the companies.<br /> <br /> Militias had originated towards the end of the 18th century when fear of revolution and war with France resulted in Scots organising themselves into part-time volunteer units. Eventually the government felt it was not enough to rely on volunteers and created a Scottish nationwide militia force in 1797. By this act the militia was required to protect the nation at home in times of threat. Each county was required to have a set number of men in the force. The volunteers had to do annual training and were given a bounty. Their services were often called upon, especially during periods of war <br /> <br /> <br /> For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please <a href="mailto: archives@highlifehighland.com">email</a> the Highland Archive Service