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TITLE
Charter of the Royal Burgh of Wick
EXTERNAL ID
AB_WICK_ART_02
PLACENAME
Wick
DISTRICT
Eastern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
DATE OF IMAGE
1589
PERIOD
1580s
CREATOR
A.J. Paterson
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
529
KEYWORDS
Charter of the Royal Burgh of Wick

This copy of the Charter of the Royal Burgh of Wick 1589 hangs in the Town Hall in Wick. It was printed by A.J. Paterson of Parliament Hall, Wick, in April 1972.

A royal burgh was a type of Scottish burgh which had been founded by, or subsequently granted, a royal charter. Although abolished in 1975, the term is still used in many of the former burghs.

Most royal burghs were seaports, and each was either created by the crown, or upgraded from another status, such as burgh of barony. As discrete classes of burgh emerged, the royal burghs originally distinctive by virtue of the fact they were on royal lands acquired a monopoly of foreign trade.

An important document for each burgh was its burgh charter, like the one pictured here, creating the burgh or confirming the rights of the burgh as laid down (perhaps verbally) by a previous monarch. Each royal burgh was represented in the Parliament of Scotland and could appoint bailies with wide powers in civil and criminal justice.

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Charter of the Royal Burgh of Wick

CAITHNESS: Wick

1580s

Am Baile

Wick Public Building Art

This copy of the Charter of the Royal Burgh of Wick 1589 hangs in the Town Hall in Wick. It was printed by A.J. Paterson of Parliament Hall, Wick, in April 1972.<br /> <br /> A royal burgh was a type of Scottish burgh which had been founded by, or subsequently granted, a royal charter. Although abolished in 1975, the term is still used in many of the former burghs.<br /> <br /> Most royal burghs were seaports, and each was either created by the crown, or upgraded from another status, such as burgh of barony. As discrete classes of burgh emerged, the royal burghs originally distinctive by virtue of the fact they were on royal lands acquired a monopoly of foreign trade.<br /> <br /> An important document for each burgh was its burgh charter, like the one pictured here, creating the burgh or confirming the rights of the burgh as laid down (perhaps verbally) by a previous monarch. Each royal burgh was represented in the Parliament of Scotland and could appoint bailies with wide powers in civil and criminal justice.