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TITLE
Loch Ewe and Inveran House
EXTERNAL ID
GAIRLOCHM_363
PLACENAME
Loch Ewe
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
SOURCE
Gairloch Heritage Museum
ASSET ID
5518
KEYWORDS
houses
lochs
Loch Ewe and Inveran House

A photograph looking across Loch Ewe, towards Inveran House. A kilted man can be seen in the foreground, hauling in his rowing boat. At the time the photograph was captured, Inveran House belonged to John Henet Dixon of Yorkshire, who was a justice of the peace (JP) for Ross and Cromarty.

Loch Ewe is a sea-loch in the district of Ross and Cromarty. It is not particularly deep, with an average depth of 15m and a maximum of 40m, but it has been a maritime assembly point of some strategic importance since at least the 17th century. During the Second World War, submarines entered the Atlantic Ocean from the loch. In addition, ship convoys headed to West Africa and North America and those on on the 'Arctic Run' north to Norway and Murmansk, also anchored in the loch.


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For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Gairloch Heritage Museum

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Loch Ewe and Inveran House

ROSS

houses; lochs

Gairloch Heritage Museum

Gairloch Heritage Museum, Photograph Collection

A photograph looking across Loch Ewe, towards Inveran House. A kilted man can be seen in the foreground, hauling in his rowing boat. At the time the photograph was captured, Inveran House belonged to John Henet Dixon of Yorkshire, who was a justice of the peace (JP) for Ross and Cromarty. <br /> <br /> Loch Ewe is a sea-loch in the district of Ross and Cromarty. It is not particularly deep, with an average depth of 15m and a maximum of 40m, but it has been a maritime assembly point of some strategic importance since at least the 17th century. During the Second World War, submarines entered the Atlantic Ocean from the loch. In addition, ship convoys headed to West Africa and North America and those on on the 'Arctic Run' north to Norway and Murmansk, also anchored in the loch. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: info@gairlochheritagemuseum.org">Gairloch Heritage Museum</a>