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TITLE
The Ferry at Scarfskerry, Caithness
EXTERNAL ID
AB_WICK_ART_28
PLACENAME
Skarfskerry
DISTRICT
Northern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Dunnet
CREATOR
William Daniell
SOURCE
Am Baile
ASSET ID
554
KEYWORDS
landscapes
seascapes
The Ferry at Scarfskerry, Caithness

This engraving of "The Ferry at Scarfskerry, Caithness" by William Daniell hangs in the Carnegie library building in Wick.

Will Daniell was an English painter. Born in Kingston-upon-Thames in Surrey. His father was a bricklayer and owner of a public house called The Swan in near-by Chertsey. Daniell's future career was dramatically changed when he was sent to live with his uncle Thomas (1749-1840) after the premature death of his father in 1779. His uncle was an artist and later Royal Academician, and William became his pupil. Uncle and nephew left Britain in April 1785 to voyage throughout China and India.

In Calcutta in 1791, they held a lottery of their combined paintings, using the proceeds to continue their travelling and sketching. They returned to Britain in 1794, where they put their experiences to use in exhibition-size oil paintings. Daniell's 'View of the East India Fleet in the Sunda Strait' reflects his travels, and in 1819 he published an illustrated book A Picturesque Voyage to India by way of China. He made sketching tours throughout the British countryside, publishing A Voyage Around Great Britain (1814-25). It was on this tour that he composed this engraving.

Around this time, in 1821, he was elected a Royal Academician. His shipping scenes, such 'A Bird's-Eye View of the East India Dock at Blackwell' (National Maritime Museum, London), were supplemented by greatly admired battle pieces. In 1825, he won a prize of £100 for a pair of the 'Battle of Trafalgar', exhibited at the British Institution. He continued to work until his death 12 years later.

A linear settlement on the north coast of Caithness, Scarfskerry overlooks an inlet of the Pentland Firth, 7 miles west of John o' Groats and 2 miles west of the Castle of Mey. The ferry house dates from the early 19th century.

In 1818 William Daniell made the trip from Scarfskerry to Melsetter taking three hours for the crossing and paying 15/- for the hire of the boat and crew.

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The Ferry at Scarfskerry, Caithness

CAITHNESS: Dunnet

landscapes; seascapes

Am Baile

Wick Public Building Art

This engraving of "The Ferry at Scarfskerry, Caithness" by William Daniell hangs in the Carnegie library building in Wick.<br /> <br /> Will Daniell was an English painter. Born in Kingston-upon-Thames in Surrey. His father was a bricklayer and owner of a public house called The Swan in near-by Chertsey. Daniell's future career was dramatically changed when he was sent to live with his uncle Thomas (1749-1840) after the premature death of his father in 1779. His uncle was an artist and later Royal Academician, and William became his pupil. Uncle and nephew left Britain in April 1785 to voyage throughout China and India. <br /> <br /> In Calcutta in 1791, they held a lottery of their combined paintings, using the proceeds to continue their travelling and sketching. They returned to Britain in 1794, where they put their experiences to use in exhibition-size oil paintings. Daniell's 'View of the East India Fleet in the Sunda Strait' reflects his travels, and in 1819 he published an illustrated book A Picturesque Voyage to India by way of China. He made sketching tours throughout the British countryside, publishing A Voyage Around Great Britain (1814-25). It was on this tour that he composed this engraving.<br /> <br /> Around this time, in 1821, he was elected a Royal Academician. His shipping scenes, such 'A Bird's-Eye View of the East India Dock at Blackwell' (National Maritime Museum, London), were supplemented by greatly admired battle pieces. In 1825, he won a prize of £100 for a pair of the 'Battle of Trafalgar', exhibited at the British Institution. He continued to work until his death 12 years later. <br /> <br /> A linear settlement on the north coast of Caithness, Scarfskerry overlooks an inlet of the Pentland Firth, 7 miles west of John o' Groats and 2 miles west of the Castle of Mey. The ferry house dates from the early 19th century.<br /> <br /> In 1818 William Daniell made the trip from Scarfskerry to Melsetter taking three hours for the crossing and paying 15/- for the hire of the boat and crew.