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TITLE
Fortrose
EXTERNAL ID
BOX3_FORTROSE
PLACENAME
Fortrose
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosemarkie
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
588
KEYWORDS
cathedrals
schools
harbours
railways
railway stations
Thomas Telford
Fortrose

The Cathedral dominates the landscape and early history of Fortrose (originally known as Chanonry of Ross, it being the property and residence of the canons of the Cathedral).

The Cathedral was established by Bishop Robert, in the 13th century, after the Bishops of Ross moved here from Rosemarkie. Building ceased during the Wars of Independence and was resumed in the late 14th century. Already in a state of disrepair after the Reformation, much of its red sandstone was removed by Oliver Cromwell's army and taken to build his fort at Inverness. The rest was taken by local villagers for their houses. All that remains are the south aisle of the nave and the nearby sacristy (undercroft) of the chapter house.

Fortrose was given a share of the burgh privileges granted to Rosemarkie, in 1455, by James I. It received its own Royal Burgh status in 1590.

Fortrose Academy was established in 1791 with classes held in the Chapter House and Seaforth House. It moved to its present site in Academy Street in 1890.

The sandstone tidal Harbour was built by Thomas Telford in 1817. The Muir of Ord to Fortrose branch of the Highland Railway was opened on 1 February 1894 with intermediate stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch. The line closed to passengers on 1 October 1951 and to freight on 13 June 1960. The weigh bridge at Fortrose remains although the rest of the station site is now a car park


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Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

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Fortrose

ROSS: Rosemarkie

cathedrals; schools; harbours; railways; railway stations; Thomas Telford

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

The Cathedral dominates the landscape and early history of Fortrose (originally known as Chanonry of Ross, it being the property and residence of the canons of the Cathedral).<br /> <br /> The Cathedral was established by Bishop Robert, in the 13th century, after the Bishops of Ross moved here from Rosemarkie. Building ceased during the Wars of Independence and was resumed in the late 14th century. Already in a state of disrepair after the Reformation, much of its red sandstone was removed by Oliver Cromwell's army and taken to build his fort at Inverness. The rest was taken by local villagers for their houses. All that remains are the south aisle of the nave and the nearby sacristy (undercroft) of the chapter house.<br /> <br /> Fortrose was given a share of the burgh privileges granted to Rosemarkie, in 1455, by James I. It received its own Royal Burgh status in 1590.<br /> <br /> Fortrose Academy was established in 1791 with classes held in the Chapter House and Seaforth House. It moved to its present site in Academy Street in 1890.<br /> <br /> The sandstone tidal Harbour was built by Thomas Telford in 1817. The Muir of Ord to Fortrose branch of the Highland Railway was opened on 1 February 1894 with intermediate stations at Redcastle, Allangrange, Munlochy and Avoch. The line closed to passengers on 1 October 1951 and to freight on 13 June 1960. The weigh bridge at Fortrose remains although the rest of the station site is now a car park <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.