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TITLE
Cromarty
EXTERNAL ID
BOX3_VILLAGE
PLACENAME
Cromarty
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Cromarty
PERIOD
1950s
CREATOR
J Nairn
SOURCE
Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)
ASSET ID
594
KEYWORDS
Cromarty
lighthouse
harbours
boats
trade
fishing industry
Thomas Urquhart
Urquhart
Royal Burgh
George Ross
industry
factories
Gaelic Church
Hugh Miller
Andrew Carnegie
World War I
World War II
conservation village
Cromarty

This view over Cromarty, looking North, shows present day cottages in the foreground and what is now the Community Hall and playground to the left. Masts and sails of boats in the harbour may be seen, as may the lighthouse, which was built in 1846.

Cromarty is on the northern tip of the Black Isle. The town is the seat of the Urquhart family. Sir Thomas Urquhart (1611-c.1660), was the first person to translate the French writer Rabelais' work into English. The town was an important port and was granted Royal Burgh status in the early thirteenth century, but as trade declined this became too expensive to maintain.

In 1772 George Ross of Pitkerie bought the town and began to redevelop it. He built a new harbour, new factories, the Gaelic Church and Cromarty Court House. However, with developing road and rail links through the Highlands the fishing industry suffered and the town's population decreased.

Cromarty is also the birthplace of Hugh Miller (1802-1856), the geologist, stonemason, journalist and folklorist. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland. The town has a library donated by the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.

The town was an important naval base in World War I and World War II, the coastal defences remaining well preserved.

Cromarty is considered as one of the best-preserved eighteenth century towns in the Highlands


This image can be purchased.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email the
Highland Photographic Archive quoting the External ID.

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Cromarty

ROSS: Cromarty

1950s

Cromarty; lighthouse; harbours; boats; trade; fishing industry; Thomas Urquhart; Urquhart; Royal Burgh; George Ross; industry; factories; Gaelic Church; Hugh Miller; Andrew Carnegie; World War I; World War II; conservation village

Highland Photographic Archive (IMAG)

Jimmy Nairn & Son

This view over Cromarty, looking North, shows present day cottages in the foreground and what is now the Community Hall and playground to the left. Masts and sails of boats in the harbour may be seen, as may the lighthouse, which was built in 1846.<br /> <br /> Cromarty is on the northern tip of the Black Isle. The town is the seat of the Urquhart family. Sir Thomas Urquhart (1611-c.1660), was the first person to translate the French writer Rabelais' work into English. The town was an important port and was granted Royal Burgh status in the early thirteenth century, but as trade declined this became too expensive to maintain.<br /> <br /> In 1772 George Ross of Pitkerie bought the town and began to redevelop it. He built a new harbour, new factories, the Gaelic Church and Cromarty Court House. However, with developing road and rail links through the Highlands the fishing industry suffered and the town's population decreased.<br /> <br /> Cromarty is also the birthplace of Hugh Miller (1802-1856), the geologist, stonemason, journalist and folklorist. His cottage, dating to 1711, is now a museum owned by the National Trust for Scotland. The town has a library donated by the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.<br /> <br /> The town was an important naval base in World War I and World War II, the coastal defences remaining well preserved.<br /> <br /> Cromarty is considered as one of the best-preserved eighteenth century towns in the Highlands <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email the<br /> <a href="mailto: photographic.archive@highlifehighland.com">Highland Photographic Archive</a> quoting the External ID.<br />