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TITLE
Collapse of Ness Bridge, 26 Jan 1849, page 1
EXTERNAL ID
Z_GB1796_GRANT_979_65_001_001
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1849
PERIOD
1840s
SOURCE
Inverness Museum and Art Gallery
ASSET ID
6549
KEYWORDS
bridges
letters
poorhouses
flooding
Collapse of Ness Bridge, 26 Jan 1849, page 1

In January 1849 the seven-arched bridge over the River Ness was swept away in floods. A new suspension bridge was completed in 1855, lasted until 1959, and was replaced by Sir Murdoch MacDonald and Partners' concrete span that we see today.

This letter from the Alexander Grant collection dates from the time of the collapse of the arched bridge. It was written by D. M. Ritchie on 26 January 1849 (recipient unknown) and describes the chaos caused by the event. Particular reference is made to those who were made homeless and found refuge in the Poor House, Bell's Institute, the Hunt Hall kitchen, and the Gaelic Church. Mr. Ritchie enclosed a donation of £2 with his letter to aid the poor

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Collapse of Ness Bridge, 26 Jan 1849, page 1

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1840s

bridges; letters; poorhouses; flooding

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Alexander Grant - miscellaneous letters

In January 1849 the seven-arched bridge over the River Ness was swept away in floods. A new suspension bridge was completed in 1855, lasted until 1959, and was replaced by Sir Murdoch MacDonald and Partners' concrete span that we see today. <br /> <br /> This letter from the Alexander Grant collection dates from the time of the collapse of the arched bridge. It was written by D. M. Ritchie on 26 January 1849 (recipient unknown) and describes the chaos caused by the event. Particular reference is made to those who were made homeless and found refuge in the Poor House, Bell's Institute, the Hunt Hall kitchen, and the Gaelic Church. Mr. Ritchie enclosed a donation of £2 with his letter to aid the poor