Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Wester Ross buildings 6 - identified as the original Inverewe House which was destroyed by fire in 1914
EXTERNAL ID
GAIRLOCHM_1907
PLACENAME
Wester Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS
DATE OF IMAGE
c1905
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Gairloch Heritage Museum
ASSET ID
7282
KEYWORDS
gardens
Wester Ross buildings 6 - identified as the original Inverewe House which was destroyed by fire in 1914

Inverewe House and Gardens, founded in 1864 by Osgood MacKenzie. He began creating a garden on the barren, rocky promontory of An Ploc Ard (The High Lump). Soil and peat were imported and thick shelter belts planted. Gradually exotic plants, shrubs and trees were introduced from all over the world creating an unique garden which benefited from the Gulf Stream passing northwards along the coast.

Osgood died in 1922, still engaged in the task of creating the garden. His daughter, Mrs Sawyer continued the work and subsequently presented the gardens to the National Trust in 1952. This picture was taken c.1905 and shows the proximity of the garden to Loch Ewe. The House was destroyed by fire in 1914. Thereafter a more modern building was erected.


This image may be available to purchase.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Gairloch Heritage Museum

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Wester Ross buildings 6 - identified as the original Inverewe House which was destroyed by fire in 1914

ROSS

1900s

gardens

Gairloch Heritage Museum

Gairloch Heritage Museum, Photograph Collection

Inverewe House and Gardens, founded in 1864 by Osgood MacKenzie. He began creating a garden on the barren, rocky promontory of An Ploc Ard (The High Lump). Soil and peat were imported and thick shelter belts planted. Gradually exotic plants, shrubs and trees were introduced from all over the world creating an unique garden which benefited from the Gulf Stream passing northwards along the coast. <br /> <br /> Osgood died in 1922, still engaged in the task of creating the garden. His daughter, Mrs Sawyer continued the work and subsequently presented the gardens to the National Trust in 1952. This picture was taken c.1905 and shows the proximity of the garden to Loch Ewe. The House was destroyed by fire in 1914. Thereafter a more modern building was erected. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: info@gairlochheritagemuseum.org">Gairloch Heritage Museum</a>