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Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge List of Schools

This is a list of schools maintained by the Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge in 1748. This list includes the location of the school, the associated Presbytery and the date the school was opened. The list also gives details on the number of girls and boys who attended each school.

The SSPCK was granted a royal charter in 1709. The society promoted Christian teaching, especially in the Highlands and Islands. Even the remote island of St. Kilda had a school. The subjects taught included not only Christian knowledge, but reading, writing and arithmetic, and, later, aspects of agriculture and housekeeping such as spinning and weaving.

Although the teaching was intended to be in English, this proved difficult for pupils who spoke only Gaelic, and so the society had the Bible translated into Gaelic

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Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge List of Schools

1740s

SSPCK; Society in Scotland for Propagating Christian Knowledge; schools; buildings; lists

Highland Folk Museum

Highland Folk Museum (documents)

This is a list of schools maintained by the Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge in 1748. This list includes the location of the school, the associated Presbytery and the date the school was opened. The list also gives details on the number of girls and boys who attended each school.<br /> <br /> The SSPCK was granted a royal charter in 1709. The society promoted Christian teaching, especially in the Highlands and Islands. Even the remote island of St. Kilda had a school. The subjects taught included not only Christian knowledge, but reading, writing and arithmetic, and, later, aspects of agriculture and housekeeping such as spinning and weaving.<br /> <br /> Although the teaching was intended to be in English, this proved difficult for pupils who spoke only Gaelic, and so the society had the Bible translated into Gaelic