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TITLE
Plan of Glencawdor Distillery
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_BN6_3_33
PLACENAME
Nairn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
NAIRN: Nairn
DATE OF IMAGE
1898
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
Charles Doig
SOURCE
Highland Archive Centre
ASSET ID
7994
KEYWORDS
architecture
plans
buildings
distilleries
architectural drawings
zoomable images

Glencawdor Distillery was founded in 1898 by Messrs. J. Mill of Nairn, D. McAndie of Inverness and J. MacKillican of Calcutta and was built on the site of the original town mill. Distilling ceased in 1901 when the company went into liquidation. In 1903 the assets were purchased by John Haigh & Co. The depression of the later 1920s took its toll on the company, however, and production ceased in 1927.

The distillery was close to the river Nairn and to a viaduct on the Inverness-Elgin railway line, on the site of the present playing field. The side flood arch of the Nairn railway viaduct was built to take the mill lade from the town meal mill and was later used by the distillery. Annual production from the two pot stills is believed to have been approximately 80,000 gallons.

The buildings were designed by Charles C Doig who invented the pagoda roofs which were used on malt kilns all over Scotland. The distillery was demolished in 1930 and the stones used to build houses on the Broadhill estate.

The plans are part of the records of the Nairn Dean of Guild Court. These courts originated in mediaeval times. A guild was a group of merchants, who were influential citizens in the burgh. Their president, known as the Dean, had a role similar to that of a magistrate. The courts were responsible for enforcing building regulations in the burgh, a function now carried out by local authority building control departments. Plans for new buildings or alterations to existing ones had to be submitted to the Dean of Guild for approval


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Plan of Glencawdor Distillery

NAIRN: Nairn

1890s

architecture; plans; buildings; distilleries; architectural drawings; zoomable images

Highland Archive Centre

Dean of Guild Plans

Glencawdor Distillery was founded in 1898 by Messrs. J. Mill of Nairn, D. McAndie of Inverness and J. MacKillican of Calcutta and was built on the site of the original town mill. Distilling ceased in 1901 when the company went into liquidation. In 1903 the assets were purchased by John Haigh & Co. The depression of the later 1920s took its toll on the company, however, and production ceased in 1927.<br /> <br /> The distillery was close to the river Nairn and to a viaduct on the Inverness-Elgin railway line, on the site of the present playing field. The side flood arch of the Nairn railway viaduct was built to take the mill lade from the town meal mill and was later used by the distillery. Annual production from the two pot stills is believed to have been approximately 80,000 gallons.<br /> <br /> The buildings were designed by Charles C Doig who invented the pagoda roofs which were used on malt kilns all over Scotland. The distillery was demolished in 1930 and the stones used to build houses on the Broadhill estate.<br /> <br /> The plans are part of the records of the Nairn Dean of Guild Court. These courts originated in mediaeval times. A guild was a group of merchants, who were influential citizens in the burgh. Their president, known as the Dean, had a role similar to that of a magistrate. The courts were responsible for enforcing building regulations in the burgh, a function now carried out by local authority building control departments. Plans for new buildings or alterations to existing ones had to be submitted to the Dean of Guild for approval <br /> <br /> <br /> For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please <a href="mailto: archives@highlifehighland.com">email</a> the Highland Archive Service