Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Fear a' Bhàta
EXTERNAL ID
HC_FM_CD1_20
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Jane Finlayson of Tong
SOURCE
Màiri Mhòr Gaelic Song Fellowship
ASSET ID
83
KEYWORDS
songs
love songs
audio

Get Adobe Flash player

Although this song is usually given as "traditional" it was actually composed in the late 18th Century by Jane Finlayson of Tong, Lewis for a young Uig fisherman, Donald MacRae. The part of this story which is rarely told is that they married each other sometime after she wrote the song.

The song appears in The Scottish Gael by James Logan, first published 1876.

This song is sung here by Fiona J MacKenzie the former Màiri Mhòr Song Fellow (2002-9). The Màiri Mhòr Gaelic Song Fellowship was set up in 2002 to encourage participation in Gaelic song events and activities and to provide a reference point for people wanting information on any aspect of Gaelic song.

Màiri Mhòr nan Oran (Mary MacPherson) was a nurse from Skeabost, Skye. She was a prolific song writer from the age of 50, writing songs of exile, praise and hope as well as songs of protest about the way the Gaels were treated by others.

The following are the lyrics to this recording:

Sèist (chorus)
Fhir a' bhàta na ho ro èile
Fhir a' bhàta na ho ro èile
Fhir a' bhàta na ho ro eile
Mo shoraidh slàn leat 's gach àit' an tèid thu.

'S tric mi sealltainn on chnoc as àirde,
Dh'fheuch am faic mi fear a' bhàta,
An tig thu 'n an-diugh, no 'n tig thu màireach,
'S mur' tig thu idir gur truagh a tha mi.

Tha mo chridhe-sa briste, brùite
'S tric na deòir a' ruith om shùilean.
An tig thu 'n nochd, no 'm bi mo dhùil riut,
No 'n dùin mi 'n doras le osna thùrsaich?

'S tric mi foighneachd de luchd nam bàta
Am fac' iad thu no am bheil thu sàbhailt'?
'S ann a tha gach fear dhiubh 'g ràitinn
Gur gòrach mise, ma thug mi gràdh dhuit.


The following is the English translation:

chorus
Boatman, o ho ro eile
Boatman, o ho ro eile
Boatman, o ho ro eile
A fond farewell wherever you go

I often look from the highest hill
To try and see the boatman
Will you come today or tomorrow
If you don't come at all I will be downhearted

My heart is broken and bruised
With tears often flowing from my eyes
Will you come tonight or will I expect you
Or will I close the door with a sad sigh?

I often ask people on boats
Whether they see you or whether you are safe
Each of them says
That I was foolish to fall in love with you.

Highland Council's Mairi Mhor song fellow, Fiona Mackenzie has published a new collection of 30 Gaelic songs from Ross-shire, entitled 'Orain nan Rosach'. The first time such a collection has been made available. The songs are presented with staff notation, guitar chords, translations, notes on the composers and photographs of Ross-shire. Some of the songs are well known 'ceilidh' songs and some are not so well known, some old and some new. This book is an essential resource for anyone interested in the Gaelic culture of the area

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Fear a' Bhàta

2000s

songs; love songs; audio

Màiri Mhòr Gaelic Song Fellowship

Seinn! o ho ro Seinn! (CD)

Although this song is usually given as "traditional" it was actually composed in the late 18th Century by Jane Finlayson of Tong, Lewis for a young Uig fisherman, Donald MacRae. The part of this story which is rarely told is that they married each other sometime after she wrote the song. <br /> <br /> The song appears in The Scottish Gael by James Logan, first published 1876.<br /> <br /> This song is sung here by Fiona J MacKenzie the former Màiri Mhòr Song Fellow (2002-9). The Màiri Mhòr Gaelic Song Fellowship was set up in 2002 to encourage participation in Gaelic song events and activities and to provide a reference point for people wanting information on any aspect of Gaelic song.<br /> <br /> Màiri Mhòr nan Oran (Mary MacPherson) was a nurse from Skeabost, Skye. She was a prolific song writer from the age of 50, writing songs of exile, praise and hope as well as songs of protest about the way the Gaels were treated by others.<br /> <br /> The following are the lyrics to this recording:<br /> <br /> Sèist (chorus)<br /> Fhir a' bhàta na ho ro èile<br /> Fhir a' bhàta na ho ro èile<br /> Fhir a' bhàta na ho ro eile<br /> Mo shoraidh slàn leat 's gach àit' an tèid thu.<br /> <br /> 'S tric mi sealltainn on chnoc as àirde,<br /> Dh'fheuch am faic mi fear a' bhàta,<br /> An tig thu 'n an-diugh, no 'n tig thu màireach,<br /> 'S mur' tig thu idir gur truagh a tha mi.<br /> <br /> Tha mo chridhe-sa briste, brùite<br /> 'S tric na deòir a' ruith om shùilean.<br /> An tig thu 'n nochd, no 'm bi mo dhùil riut,<br /> No 'n dùin mi 'n doras le osna thùrsaich?<br /> <br /> 'S tric mi foighneachd de luchd nam bàta<br /> Am fac' iad thu no am bheil thu sàbhailt'?<br /> 'S ann a tha gach fear dhiubh 'g ràitinn<br /> Gur gòrach mise, ma thug mi gràdh dhuit.<br /> <br /> <br /> The following is the English translation:<br /> <br /> chorus<br /> Boatman, o ho ro eile<br /> Boatman, o ho ro eile<br /> Boatman, o ho ro eile<br /> A fond farewell wherever you go<br /> <br /> I often look from the highest hill<br /> To try and see the boatman<br /> Will you come today or tomorrow<br /> If you don't come at all I will be downhearted<br /> <br /> My heart is broken and bruised<br /> With tears often flowing from my eyes<br /> Will you come tonight or will I expect you<br /> Or will I close the door with a sad sigh?<br /> <br /> I often ask people on boats<br /> Whether they see you or whether you are safe<br /> Each of them says<br /> That I was foolish to fall in love with you.<br /> <br /> Highland Council's Mairi Mhor song fellow, Fiona Mackenzie has published a new collection of 30 Gaelic songs from Ross-shire, entitled 'Orain nan Rosach'. The first time such a collection has been made available. The songs are presented with staff notation, guitar chords, translations, notes on the composers and photographs of Ross-shire. Some of the songs are well known 'ceilidh' songs and some are not so well known, some old and some new. This book is an essential resource for anyone interested in the Gaelic culture of the area