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National Registration Identity Card

This is the outside cover of a World War 2 identity card. The government introduced National Registration Identity Cards under the National Registration Act 1939. Initially, adult identity cards were brown, the same colour as children's cards, but in 1943 the blue card was introduced for adults.

On the back of the identity card there is a notice to the owner:

1. Always carry your Identity Card. You must produce it on demand by a Police Officer in uniform or member of HM Armed Forces in uniform on duty.
2. You are responsible for this Card, and must not part with it to any other person. You must report at once to the local National Registration Office if it is lost, destroyed, damaged or defaced.
3. If you find a lost Identity Card or have in your possession a Card not belonging to yourself or anyone in your charge you must hand it in at once at a Police Station or National Registration Office.
4. Any breach of these requirements is an offence punishable by a fine or imprisonment or both.

All civilians, including children, had to carry an identity card at all times to show who they were and where they lived. The identity card gave the owner's name, address and previous addresses. Each person was allocated a National Registration number which was written on the inside of the card. The local registration office stamped the card to make it valid.

Identification was necessary in case families became separated in the event of bombing or if the children were evacuated to another part of the country. People also had to produce their identity card along with their ration book when they were claiming their share of food or clothes.

The British wartime identity card scheme was abolished in 1952.

This identity card was supplied by William Shand who was interviewed by pupils of Rosebank Primary School, Nairn, as part of a War Detectives project in 2005

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National Registration Identity Card

1940s

War Detectives; World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; ID card; ID cards; identity card; identity cards; identification; Home Front

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (documents)

This is the outside cover of a World War 2 identity card. The government introduced National Registration Identity Cards under the National Registration Act 1939. Initially, adult identity cards were brown, the same colour as children's cards, but in 1943 the blue card was introduced for adults.<br /> <br /> On the back of the identity card there is a notice to the owner:<br /> <br /> 1. Always carry your Identity Card. You must produce it on demand by a Police Officer in uniform or member of HM Armed Forces in uniform on duty.<br /> 2. You are responsible for this Card, and must not part with it to any other person. You must report at once to the local National Registration Office if it is lost, destroyed, damaged or defaced.<br /> 3. If you find a lost Identity Card or have in your possession a Card not belonging to yourself or anyone in your charge you must hand it in at once at a Police Station or National Registration Office.<br /> 4. Any breach of these requirements is an offence punishable by a fine or imprisonment or both.<br /> <br /> All civilians, including children, had to carry an identity card at all times to show who they were and where they lived. The identity card gave the owner's name, address and previous addresses. Each person was allocated a National Registration number which was written on the inside of the card. The local registration office stamped the card to make it valid. <br /> <br /> Identification was necessary in case families became separated in the event of bombing or if the children were evacuated to another part of the country. People also had to produce their identity card along with their ration book when they were claiming their share of food or clothes. <br /> <br /> The British wartime identity card scheme was abolished in 1952.<br /> <br /> This identity card was supplied by William Shand who was interviewed by pupils of Rosebank Primary School, Nairn, as part of a War Detectives project in 2005