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TITLE
Clothing Book 1947-48
EXTERNAL ID
Z_PC_WD_WS_021
PERIOD
1940s
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
8358
KEYWORDS
War Detectives
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
rations
rationing
coupon
token
tokens
Clothing Book 1947-48

This is an example of a clothing ration book in use shortly after World War II. During the war it became difficult to import cloth from abroad and British clothing manufacturers had to use what material they could get to make parachutes and uniforms for the Armed Forces rather than clothes for ordinary people. As a result, clothes had to be rationed from June 1941 onwards.

Every man, woman and child in Britain was issued with a ration book containing magenta, olive and crimson coupons which had no monetary value but were a way of ensuring that everybody got a fair share of what was available. In 1941 each person was allowed a maximum of 66 coupons per year, which was equivalent to one complete outfit. The shopkeeper would remove the coupons before he issued the goods. Note 3 of the 'How to use this book' instructions states that 'it is illegal for the shopkeeper to accept loose coupons.'

In order to minimise waste, people were also encouraged to 'make do and mend' and to hand down outgrown children's clothes. Special utility clothing was made which used as little cloth as possible. Items such as a bridal dress would be passed around among family and friends, to be worn on more than one occasion.

Although the war ended in 1945, shortages continued for some time after that. Clothes rationing continued until 1949 and food rationing until 1952.

This clothing book was supplied by William Shand who was interviewed by pupils of Rosebank Primary School, Nairn, as part of a War Detectives project in 2005

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Clothing Book 1947-48

1940s

War Detectives; World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; rations; rationing; coupon; token; tokens

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (documents)

This is an example of a clothing ration book in use shortly after World War II. During the war it became difficult to import cloth from abroad and British clothing manufacturers had to use what material they could get to make parachutes and uniforms for the Armed Forces rather than clothes for ordinary people. As a result, clothes had to be rationed from June 1941 onwards. <br /> <br /> Every man, woman and child in Britain was issued with a ration book containing magenta, olive and crimson coupons which had no monetary value but were a way of ensuring that everybody got a fair share of what was available. In 1941 each person was allowed a maximum of 66 coupons per year, which was equivalent to one complete outfit. The shopkeeper would remove the coupons before he issued the goods. Note 3 of the 'How to use this book' instructions states that 'it is illegal for the shopkeeper to accept loose coupons.'<br /> <br /> In order to minimise waste, people were also encouraged to 'make do and mend' and to hand down outgrown children's clothes. Special utility clothing was made which used as little cloth as possible. Items such as a bridal dress would be passed around among family and friends, to be worn on more than one occasion.<br /> <br /> Although the war ended in 1945, shortages continued for some time after that. Clothes rationing continued until 1949 and food rationing until 1952.<br /> <br /> This clothing book was supplied by William Shand who was interviewed by pupils of Rosebank Primary School, Nairn, as part of a War Detectives project in 2005