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TITLE
Account of the aftermath of clearance at Brora
EXTERNAL ID
Z_QZP40_258_101
PLACENAME
Brora
DISTRICT
Kildonan, Loth and Clyne
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Clyne
PERIOD
1820s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
8918
KEYWORDS
clearances
Brora
coal
mining
land
houses
Account of the aftermath of clearance at Brora

A Page taken from 'A Summer Ramble in the North Highlands' by Alexander Sutherland. The writer describes a visit to Brora, a small coastal town in Sutherland. The first page deals with the centre of Brora and describes the houses, which are tile roofed, and the coal mining which is paid for by Lady Stafford. As far as the author can see, anything which is needed is being done for the people. The second page describes an area away from the centre of Brora which has been cleared of its people. He describes the houses as charred and roofless with furniture lying, discarded beside them. He observes the deserted, desolate feel to the place and says 'it is impossible for a stranger, with such a scene before him, to keep his mind totally free from prejudice.'

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Account of the aftermath of clearance at Brora

SUTHERLAND: Clyne

1820s

clearances; Brora; coal; mining; land; houses

Highland Libraries

A Page taken from 'A Summer Ramble in the North Highlands' by Alexander Sutherland. The writer describes a visit to Brora, a small coastal town in Sutherland. The first page deals with the centre of Brora and describes the houses, which are tile roofed, and the coal mining which is paid for by Lady Stafford. As far as the author can see, anything which is needed is being done for the people. The second page describes an area away from the centre of Brora which has been cleared of its people. He describes the houses as charred and roofless with furniture lying, discarded beside them. He observes the deserted, desolate feel to the place and says 'it is impossible for a stranger, with such a scene before him, to keep his mind totally free from prejudice.'