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Election Literature, 1874: "Charles Fraser MacKintosh - the Workmen's Candidate"

This item of election literature was issued by Charles Fraser MacKintosh, a candidate in the General Election of 1874 for the Inverness Burghs. In it he illustrates his credentials as a voice for the working man - a group enfranchised by the Reform Act of 1867. The attitude of Fraser MacKintosh (sometimes referred to as 'Drummond') to the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1871 is compared to that of his main rival, MacKintosh of Raigmore.

The Trade Union Act, 1871, recognised unions as legal bodies with the right to own property and funds. Unions were allowed to protect these assets legally and also to conduct strikes. However, the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1871, was passed on the same day and effectively took away the power of strike action. Despite being able to conduct strikes under the Trade Union Act, this second piece of legislation forbade the use of picketing of any description (even peaceful picketing) and left trade unionists as vulnerable to criminal prosecution as they had been before. This Act was repealed in 1875.

The result of the election for the Inverness Burghs seat (comprising Inverness, Nairn, Forres, and Fortrose) was:
Fraser MacKintosh (independent Liberal) 1134
MacKintosh of Raigmore (Liberal) 879
MacKintosh of Holme (Conservative) 16.
In the election as a whole the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, won a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraeli's Conservatives secured a majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats

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Election Literature, 1874: "Charles Fraser MacKintosh - the Workmen's Candidate"

1870s

elections; politics; politicians; political parties; trade unions; strikes

Highland Libraries

Papers relating to the political career of Charles Fraser Mackintosh

This item of election literature was issued by Charles Fraser MacKintosh, a candidate in the General Election of 1874 for the Inverness Burghs. In it he illustrates his credentials as a voice for the working man - a group enfranchised by the Reform Act of 1867. The attitude of Fraser MacKintosh (sometimes referred to as 'Drummond') to the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1871 is compared to that of his main rival, MacKintosh of Raigmore.<br /> <br /> The Trade Union Act, 1871, recognised unions as legal bodies with the right to own property and funds. Unions were allowed to protect these assets legally and also to conduct strikes. However, the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1871, was passed on the same day and effectively took away the power of strike action. Despite being able to conduct strikes under the Trade Union Act, this second piece of legislation forbade the use of picketing of any description (even peaceful picketing) and left trade unionists as vulnerable to criminal prosecution as they had been before. This Act was repealed in 1875.<br /> <br /> The result of the election for the Inverness Burghs seat (comprising Inverness, Nairn, Forres, and Fortrose) was:<br /> Fraser MacKintosh (independent Liberal) 1134<br /> MacKintosh of Raigmore (Liberal) 879<br /> MacKintosh of Holme (Conservative) 16.<br /> In the election as a whole the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, won a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraeli's Conservatives secured a majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats