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TITLE
Bridge over channel Nostie Bridge Hydro-Electric Scheme
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_RAMSAY_D893_1_13_027
PLACENAME
Nostie Bridge
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
DATE OF IMAGE
1955
PERIOD
1950s
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
9119
KEYWORDS
Nostie Bridge
hydro-electric
Lochalsh
reservoir
drought
Bridge over channel Nostie Bridge Hydro-Electric Scheme

In 1955 there was a drought in the west Highlands during the summer months. While a boon for tourists and visitors, the continued lack of rainfall threatened to disrupt water supplies. The reservoir above the hydro-electric power station at Nostie Bridge which served the Lochalsh area reached such a low level that action had to be taken. The local hydro-electric workers proceeded to dig a channel with pick and shovel from Loch Smeòraich to drain into the reservoir at Gleann Udalain, a distance of nearly one mile. This photograph shows some of the workers carrying a makeshift bridge to span the channel. The three men standing in front are John (Smeoc) Finlayson, Johnny 'The Guy', and Tommy Byrnes.

The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric project for the Lochalsh area was situated at Nostie Bridge, six miles from Kyle of Lochalsh. Work began in 1946 after an official pole raising ceremony that May, and the station was energized in December 1948. Original plans showed two dams, but the terrain proved unsuitable, and one dam was built across Allt Gleann Udalain. The reservoir, dam and power station were constructed at the same time as progress was going ahead with the distribution network, and in laying underwater cables across Loch Duich, Loch Long, Loch Carron and Loch Alsh.

The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board was established under the Hydro-Electric Development (Scotland) Act 1943. Thomas Johnston presented the Act in the House of Commons, declaring that by harnessing 'the great latent power of the region' it would assist in remedying the ills that affected the Highlands. Johnston told the Commons that 'industries, whether owned nationally or privately, will be and ought to be, attracted to locations in the Highlands, as a result of this measure'.

Ordinary consumers would have priority, then the anticipated large power users, and any surplus energy would be sold to the national grid. Profits from these sales would help reduce distribution costs to more remote areas, and assist in carrying out measures for the economic development and social improvement of the Highlands. This famous social clause gave recognition that the Hydro Board was envisaged as an instrument for the rehabilitation of northern Scotland, not just an organization to provide electricity.

The output from the power station at Loch Sloy, west of Loch Lomond, was intended to meet the demand for central and western Scotland. The surplus energy produced here would be used to subsidise the Morar and Lochalsh projects, it being unlikely these smaller schemes could pay their way. The cost of construction of these three projects was estimated at £4,600,000


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Bridge over channel Nostie Bridge Hydro-Electric Scheme

ROSS: Lochalsh

1950s

Nostie Bridge; hydro-electric; Lochalsh; reservoir; drought

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

William J Ramsay Archive

In 1955 there was a drought in the west Highlands during the summer months. While a boon for tourists and visitors, the continued lack of rainfall threatened to disrupt water supplies. The reservoir above the hydro-electric power station at Nostie Bridge which served the Lochalsh area reached such a low level that action had to be taken. The local hydro-electric workers proceeded to dig a channel with pick and shovel from Loch Smeòraich to drain into the reservoir at Gleann Udalain, a distance of nearly one mile. This photograph shows some of the workers carrying a makeshift bridge to span the channel. The three men standing in front are John (Smeoc) Finlayson, Johnny 'The Guy', and Tommy Byrnes.<br /> <br /> The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric project for the Lochalsh area was situated at Nostie Bridge, six miles from Kyle of Lochalsh. Work began in 1946 after an official pole raising ceremony that May, and the station was energized in December 1948. Original plans showed two dams, but the terrain proved unsuitable, and one dam was built across Allt Gleann Udalain. The reservoir, dam and power station were constructed at the same time as progress was going ahead with the distribution network, and in laying underwater cables across Loch Duich, Loch Long, Loch Carron and Loch Alsh.<br /> <br /> The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board was established under the Hydro-Electric Development (Scotland) Act 1943. Thomas Johnston presented the Act in the House of Commons, declaring that by harnessing 'the great latent power of the region' it would assist in remedying the ills that affected the Highlands. Johnston told the Commons that 'industries, whether owned nationally or privately, will be and ought to be, attracted to locations in the Highlands, as a result of this measure'.<br /> <br /> Ordinary consumers would have priority, then the anticipated large power users, and any surplus energy would be sold to the national grid. Profits from these sales would help reduce distribution costs to more remote areas, and assist in carrying out measures for the economic development and social improvement of the Highlands. This famous social clause gave recognition that the Hydro Board was envisaged as an instrument for the rehabilitation of northern Scotland, not just an organization to provide electricity.<br /> <br /> The output from the power station at Loch Sloy, west of Loch Lomond, was intended to meet the demand for central and western Scotland. The surplus energy produced here would be used to subsidise the Morar and Lochalsh projects, it being unlikely these smaller schemes could pay their way. The cost of construction of these three projects was estimated at £4,600,000 <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a>