Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Hydro Electric Display
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_RAMSAY_D893_1_17_002
PLACENAME
Lerwick
DATE OF IMAGE
1962
PERIOD
1960s
SOURCE
Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre
ASSET ID
9261
KEYWORDS
hydro-electric
slogans
float
parade
Hydro Electric Display

By the mid-1960s hydro-electric was becoming available to most communities in the Highlands. The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board were eager to get as many households as possible wired for electricity, and fitted with all the new appliances. Electrical appliances were sold at many shops, and the High Street of most towns had a Hydro shop. Displays to show off these appliances and demonstrations on their use were common. This photograph shows a shop front display in Lerwick in spring 1962. The theme was to show the advantages of cooking with electricity. "No mess! No disappointments! No guesswork!", as well as the positive, "So efficient, So economical!" - signs all aimed to convince the modern householder that cooking by electricity was the way forward.

The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board was established under the Hydro-Electric Development (Scotland) Act 1943. Thomas Johnston presented the Act in the House of Commons, declaring that by harnessing 'the great latent power of the region' it would assist in remedying the ills that affected the Highlands. Johnston told the Commons that 'industries, whether owned nationally or privately, will be and ought to be, attracted to locations in the Highlands, as a result of this measure'.

Ordinary consumers would have priority, then the anticipated large power users, and any surplus energy would be sold to the national grid. Profits from these sales would help reduce distribution costs to more remote areas, and assist in carrying out measures for the economic development and social improvement of the Highlands. This famous social clause gave recognition that the Hydro Board was envisaged as an instrument for the rehabilitation of northern Scotland, not just an organization to provide electricity.

The output from the power station at Loch Sloy, west of Loch Lomond, was intended to meet the demand for central and western Scotland. The surplus energy produced here would be used to subsidise the Morar and Lochalsh projects, it being unlikely these smaller schemes could pay their way. The cost of construction of these three projects was estimated at £4,600,000


This image can be purchased.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Skye and Lochalsh Archives

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Hydro Electric Display

1960s

hydro-electric; slogans; float; parade

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre

William J Ramsay Archive

By the mid-1960s hydro-electric was becoming available to most communities in the Highlands. The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board were eager to get as many households as possible wired for electricity, and fitted with all the new appliances. Electrical appliances were sold at many shops, and the High Street of most towns had a Hydro shop. Displays to show off these appliances and demonstrations on their use were common. This photograph shows a shop front display in Lerwick in spring 1962. The theme was to show the advantages of cooking with electricity. "No mess! No disappointments! No guesswork!", as well as the positive, "So efficient, So economical!" - signs all aimed to convince the modern householder that cooking by electricity was the way forward.<br /> <br /> The North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board was established under the Hydro-Electric Development (Scotland) Act 1943. Thomas Johnston presented the Act in the House of Commons, declaring that by harnessing 'the great latent power of the region' it would assist in remedying the ills that affected the Highlands. Johnston told the Commons that 'industries, whether owned nationally or privately, will be and ought to be, attracted to locations in the Highlands, as a result of this measure'.<br /> <br /> Ordinary consumers would have priority, then the anticipated large power users, and any surplus energy would be sold to the national grid. Profits from these sales would help reduce distribution costs to more remote areas, and assist in carrying out measures for the economic development and social improvement of the Highlands. This famous social clause gave recognition that the Hydro Board was envisaged as an instrument for the rehabilitation of northern Scotland, not just an organization to provide electricity.<br /> <br /> The output from the power station at Loch Sloy, west of Loch Lomond, was intended to meet the demand for central and western Scotland. The surplus energy produced here would be used to subsidise the Morar and Lochalsh projects, it being unlikely these smaller schemes could pay their way. The cost of construction of these three projects was estimated at £4,600,000 <br /> <br /> <br /> This image can be purchased.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href= "mailto: skyeandlochalsh.archives@highlifehighland.com" >Skye and Lochalsh Archives</a>