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The original letter calling the Society for the Support of Gaelic Schools together, states that 'very large numbers of our countrymen in the Highlands and Islands, cannot read any language whatever, and do not enjoy the means of instruction' and that native Gaelic speakers 'derive little or no advantage from being instructed in a language which they never speak'.
The Parish schools and the SSPCK schools which were good in the past were now inadequate to deal with the large, spread out districts.
It was proposed to establish a society whose only purpose was to support teachers in teaching children and adults to read the Scriptures in Gaelic, the only language they understood. The best way of doing this was through 'circulating schools', where the Society moved teachers around every few years according to necessity. Education in an area a teacher had left behind was either carried on by the people themselves or by a schoolmaster appointed by the people at their own expense.
Although people were to be taught to read the Scriptures, teachers were not to be preachers of public exhorters.


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8th Annual Report of The Society for the Support of Gaelic Schools page map

1810s

schools; education; Gaelic; scriptures; Bible; reading; languages; teaching; teachers; societies; SSPCK; parish schools; circulating schools; Society for the Support of Gaelic Schools; Gaelic Schools Society; reports; minutes; zoomable

Highland Archive Centre

The original letter calling the Society for the Support of Gaelic Schools together, states that 'very large numbers of our countrymen in the Highlands and Islands, cannot read any language whatever, and do not enjoy the means of instruction' and that native Gaelic speakers 'derive little or no advantage from being instructed in a language which they never speak'. <br /> The Parish schools and the SSPCK schools which were good in the past were now inadequate to deal with the large, spread out districts. <br /> It was proposed to establish a society whose only purpose was to support teachers in teaching children and adults to read the Scriptures in Gaelic, the only language they understood. The best way of doing this was through 'circulating schools', where the Society moved teachers around every few years according to necessity. Education in an area a teacher had left behind was either carried on by the people themselves or by a schoolmaster appointed by the people at their own expense. <br /> Although people were to be taught to read the Scriptures, teachers were not to be preachers of public exhorters. <br /> <br /> <br /> For further information about this item and the collection to which it belongs, please <a href="mailto: archives@highlifehighland.com">email</a> the Highland Archive Service