Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 21/09/2017
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TIOTAL
'Landscapes'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_ANGUS_MARTIN_01
ÀITE
Beinn Ghuaillean
SGÌRE
Cinn Tìre
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
EARRA-GHÀIDHEAL: Ceann Loch Chille Chiarain
DEIT
2008
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
Angus Martin
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Am Baile
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1249
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
cruthan-tìre litreachais

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Tha Angus Martin a' leughadh an rosg a rinn e, 'Landscapes', sa phìos chlaistinneach seo. (Dealbh le cead coibhneil o Sheòras Mac Sporain.)

'The landscapes I love are all in Kintyre. Nowhere else in the world interests me, except in books. If I were warned tomorrow that should I ever leave Kintyre I would be killed immediately, the threat wouldn't in the least bother me; in fact, it would provide the perfect excuse for never having to go anywhere else again.

Kintyre is not only my birthplace, but also the birthplace of many of my ancestors, so that I can go to specific places - ruins now, mostly - and think to myself, 'The MacKerrals were here' (at Balnabraid) or, 'The MacKays were here' (at Earadale), and so on. These historical and genealogical associations strengthen my bond with the landscape and also inform much of my writing.

At different times of my life, I have gravitated towards different places. As a boy, Kilchousland shore was the main place. I'd cycle there and spend hours at low tide looking into rock pools. Then followed the Learside and the Inneans, coastal destinations again. I camped often at the Inneans in the early 1980s, receiving from its rugged Atlantic isolation something my spirit must have needed at the time.

Then, in the late 1980s - by which time I was married with a young family - my fascination with the sea diminished, and Bengullion became the place. I still visit other places from time to time, but Bengullion remains the constant, not least because, from my home in Campbeltown, I can conveniently walk there with my dog Benjie.

Bengullion is from Gaelic Beinn Ghuaillean, the hill of shoulders. In 1979, it was planted with a mixture of sitka spruce, Japanese larch and lodgepole pine. I was among the hundreds of objectors to the afforestation proposal, but have since accepted the trees and even come to like them, not least when I find myself out in strong wind or heavy rain.

Bengullion has given me many benefits in my lifetime. For several years, in the late '80s and early '90s, I cut peats on the moorland at the back of the hill; since 1987, I have gathered annually from the abundance of blaeberries which grows there from June until September; I have observed, with unfailing delight, the flora and fauna of the hill and watched many bird species, including hen harrier, merlin, peregrine falcon, black grouse and - in 2008, for the first time - crossbill.

There have also been the pleasures of human companionship on the hill, mostly with my friends George McSporran and Jimmy MacDonald, who share my interests. We walk there throughout the year, in daylight and, come winter, in darkness too.

There are times, however, when I prefer to be alone on the hill, especially when I am capable - which isn't always - of writing poems. Then I'll find an isolated and congenial spot, sit there for half-an-hour or an hour with coffee-flask and tobacco-pipe, and, if there is a subject I can write about - and there usually is, be it something I have seen on the hill or something glimpsed in my mind - then I'll write about it. These places have become extra-special to me. For me, they live in the poems written there, and the poems live in the places.'

Rugadh Aonghas Màrtainn ann an Ceann Loch Chill' Chiarain ann an 1952 agus 's ann à ginealaichean de dh'iasgairean sgìre Dhail an Tobair a tha e. Dh'fhàs e suas le mion-eòlas air iasgairean na sgìre agus na sgeulachdan aca, agus lean e iad don mhuir leis a' chabhlach iasgaich sgìreil. Ach mar dhuine òg, thàinig nàdar de dh'iompachadh air agus dh'fhàg e an dreuchd dhualchasach sin gus an tòisicheadh e a' sgrìobhadh. Thug 'The Ring-net Fishermen' (1981) sa bhad e an aithne dhaoine mar neach-rannsaiche a bha mion-eòlach is smaoineachail. Thàinig tòrr de na sgrìobh e o agallamhan a rinn e le daoine.

Chuir Aonghas eòlas air coimhearsnachdan tuathanais Chinn Tìre fhad 's a bha e ag obair san sgìre, an toiseach mar fhear-togail an sgudail agus a-rithist mar phost a-muigh air an dùthaich. Chaidh a chiad eachdraidh shòisealta, 'Kintyre Country Life', fhoillseachadh ann an 1987. Tha Aonghas cuideachd a' deasachadh 'The Magazine of the Kintyre Antiquarian and Natural History Society'.

Stèidhich 'The Larch Plantation' (1990) ainm Aonghais mar bhàrd smuaineachail, air a bhrosnachadh le cruthan tìre agus muinntir Chinn Tìre. Tha e pòsda, le dithis nighean, ach 's ann ainneamh a bhios e a' siubhal a-mach a sgìre Chinn Tìre. Tha e air aithneachadh air feadh saoghal litreachais na h-Alba a bhith na thasglann de dh'eachdraidh agus de dhualchas sgìreil agus cuideachd na eòlaiche air gach uisge beatha, mac na braiche, o Cheann Loch Chill' Chiarain.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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'Landscapes'

EARRA-GHÀIDHEAL: Ceann Loch Chille Chiarain

2000an

claistinneach; cruthan-tìre litreachais

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: Angus Martin

Tha Angus Martin a' leughadh an rosg a rinn e, 'Landscapes', sa phìos chlaistinneach seo. (Dealbh le cead coibhneil o Sheòras Mac Sporain.)<br /> <br /> 'The landscapes I love are all in Kintyre. Nowhere else in the world interests me, except in books. If I were warned tomorrow that should I ever leave Kintyre I would be killed immediately, the threat wouldn't in the least bother me; in fact, it would provide the perfect excuse for never having to go anywhere else again.<br /> <br /> Kintyre is not only my birthplace, but also the birthplace of many of my ancestors, so that I can go to specific places - ruins now, mostly - and think to myself, 'The MacKerrals were here' (at Balnabraid) or, 'The MacKays were here' (at Earadale), and so on. These historical and genealogical associations strengthen my bond with the landscape and also inform much of my writing.<br /> <br /> At different times of my life, I have gravitated towards different places. As a boy, Kilchousland shore was the main place. I'd cycle there and spend hours at low tide looking into rock pools. Then followed the Learside and the Inneans, coastal destinations again. I camped often at the Inneans in the early 1980s, receiving from its rugged Atlantic isolation something my spirit must have needed at the time.<br /> <br /> Then, in the late 1980s - by which time I was married with a young family - my fascination with the sea diminished, and Bengullion became the place. I still visit other places from time to time, but Bengullion remains the constant, not least because, from my home in Campbeltown, I can conveniently walk there with my dog Benjie.<br /> <br /> Bengullion is from Gaelic Beinn Ghuaillean, the hill of shoulders. In 1979, it was planted with a mixture of sitka spruce, Japanese larch and lodgepole pine. I was among the hundreds of objectors to the afforestation proposal, but have since accepted the trees and even come to like them, not least when I find myself out in strong wind or heavy rain.<br /> <br /> Bengullion has given me many benefits in my lifetime. For several years, in the late '80s and early '90s, I cut peats on the moorland at the back of the hill; since 1987, I have gathered annually from the abundance of blaeberries which grows there from June until September; I have observed, with unfailing delight, the flora and fauna of the hill and watched many bird species, including hen harrier, merlin, peregrine falcon, black grouse and - in 2008, for the first time - crossbill.<br /> <br /> There have also been the pleasures of human companionship on the hill, mostly with my friends George McSporran and Jimmy MacDonald, who share my interests. We walk there throughout the year, in daylight and, come winter, in darkness too.<br /> <br /> There are times, however, when I prefer to be alone on the hill, especially when I am capable - which isn't always - of writing poems. Then I'll find an isolated and congenial spot, sit there for half-an-hour or an hour with coffee-flask and tobacco-pipe, and, if there is a subject I can write about - and there usually is, be it something I have seen on the hill or something glimpsed in my mind - then I'll write about it. These places have become extra-special to me. For me, they live in the poems written there, and the poems live in the places.'<br /> <br /> Rugadh Aonghas Màrtainn ann an Ceann Loch Chill' Chiarain ann an 1952 agus 's ann à ginealaichean de dh'iasgairean sgìre Dhail an Tobair a tha e. Dh'fhàs e suas le mion-eòlas air iasgairean na sgìre agus na sgeulachdan aca, agus lean e iad don mhuir leis a' chabhlach iasgaich sgìreil. Ach mar dhuine òg, thàinig nàdar de dh'iompachadh air agus dh'fhàg e an dreuchd dhualchasach sin gus an tòisicheadh e a' sgrìobhadh. Thug 'The Ring-net Fishermen' (1981) sa bhad e an aithne dhaoine mar neach-rannsaiche a bha mion-eòlach is smaoineachail. Thàinig tòrr de na sgrìobh e o agallamhan a rinn e le daoine.<br /> <br /> Chuir Aonghas eòlas air coimhearsnachdan tuathanais Chinn Tìre fhad 's a bha e ag obair san sgìre, an toiseach mar fhear-togail an sgudail agus a-rithist mar phost a-muigh air an dùthaich. Chaidh a chiad eachdraidh shòisealta, 'Kintyre Country Life', fhoillseachadh ann an 1987. Tha Aonghas cuideachd a' deasachadh 'The Magazine of the Kintyre Antiquarian and Natural History Society'. <br /> <br /> Stèidhich 'The Larch Plantation' (1990) ainm Aonghais mar bhàrd smuaineachail, air a bhrosnachadh le cruthan tìre agus muinntir Chinn Tìre. Tha e pòsda, le dithis nighean, ach 's ann ainneamh a bhios e a' siubhal a-mach a sgìre Chinn Tìre. Tha e air aithneachadh air feadh saoghal litreachais na h-Alba a bhith na thasglann de dh'eachdraidh agus de dhualchas sgìreil agus cuideachd na eòlaiche air gach uisge beatha, mac na braiche, o Cheann Loch Chill' Chiarain.