Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
'My Little Town of Cromarty' (3)
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_DAVID_ALSTON_03
ÀITE
Cromba
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Crombaidh
DEIT
2008
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
David Alston
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Am Baile
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1280
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
cruthan-tìre litreachais

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Tha a' chuibhreann chlaistinneach seo o 'My Little Town of Cromarty, the History of a Northern Scottish Town' le Daibhidh Alston, foillsichte ann an 2006. Tha e air a leughadh an seo leis an ùghdar.

'In the mid 1790s a family named Middleton arrived in Cromarty from Berwickshire. They originated from near Darlington but had farmed at Norham-on-Tweed since the 1770s. There were three brothers - William Middleton, who took the lease of Kirkton farm on the Newhall estate; George Middleton, who before 1795 revived the trade in salt pork from Cromarty and from 1801, or before, took a long lease of Davidston farm; and a Thomas Middleton, who in 1807 supplied carts, men and horses for the rebuilding of Newhall House. William was drowned near Kirkton in 1794, along with his grieve, who had come to the area with them, and nothing more is known of Thomas. George had taken on the lease of Kirkton by 1803 and also had the lease of Newhall Mains before 1807.

George Middleton's recognised expertise allowed him to raise capital for his improvements. By 1803 he had borrowed £400 from the Cromarty estate and, in 1804, a further £500 from Charles Lockhart of Kindeace, using his property near Cromarty harbour as security. He was also allowed to run up arrears of rent amounting, at his death in 1810, to almost £400. Writing in 1836, Hugh Miller saw Middleton as the key improver of the period, whose innovations included building the first steam thrashing mill. He grew wheat, although he considered that it was not prudent to risk sowing too much of this crop, and by sowing Polish oats, rather than older varieties, he was achieving a sixteenfold return. Middleton also engaged in other business - trade in salt cod and pork, the tenancy of the meal and flower mill at Braelangwell, and a short-lived attempt to ship flagstone from a quarry at Davidston. The improvements to Davidstone can be seen on the estate maps of 1823 in the form of larger, consolidated fields forming a 300-acre farm. The farm had been created by the removal of eleven tenants - among forty-five on the estate who were served with summons of removal in 1794 and 1795. There was, understandably, resentment and in 1815 Middleton's house was damaged by a mob who suspected him of hoarding grain.'

Rugadh 's thogadh Daibhidh Alston air a' Ghàidhealtachd agus tha e air fuireach ann an Cromba fad fhichead bliadhna. Fhuair e PhD ann an Eachdraidh Albannach o Oilthigh Dhùin Deagh ann an 1999.

Tha Daibhidh air a bhith an luib obair Taigh-cùirte Chrombaigh fad iomadh bliadhna, an toiseach san leasachadh dheth agus an uair sin mar thaigh-tasgaidh beatha Chrombaigh. Chaidh a thaghadh do Chomhairle na Gàidhealtachd an toiseach ann an 1999 agus tha e an-diugh na fhear-cathrach aig Comataidh Sgrùdaidh is Mion-sheallaidh (Audit & Scrutiny). A bharrachd air eachdraidh thomaideach air Cromba, foillsichte ann an 2006, 's e an t-ùghdar aig iomadh leabhran air eachdraidh na sgìre.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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'My Little Town of Cromarty' (3)

ROS: Crombaidh

2000an

claistinneach; cruthan-tìre litreachais

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: David Alston

Tha a' chuibhreann chlaistinneach seo o 'My Little Town of Cromarty, the History of a Northern Scottish Town' le Daibhidh Alston, foillsichte ann an 2006. Tha e air a leughadh an seo leis an ùghdar.<br /> <br /> 'In the mid 1790s a family named Middleton arrived in Cromarty from Berwickshire. They originated from near Darlington but had farmed at Norham-on-Tweed since the 1770s. There were three brothers - William Middleton, who took the lease of Kirkton farm on the Newhall estate; George Middleton, who before 1795 revived the trade in salt pork from Cromarty and from 1801, or before, took a long lease of Davidston farm; and a Thomas Middleton, who in 1807 supplied carts, men and horses for the rebuilding of Newhall House. William was drowned near Kirkton in 1794, along with his grieve, who had come to the area with them, and nothing more is known of Thomas. George had taken on the lease of Kirkton by 1803 and also had the lease of Newhall Mains before 1807.<br /> <br /> George Middleton's recognised expertise allowed him to raise capital for his improvements. By 1803 he had borrowed £400 from the Cromarty estate and, in 1804, a further £500 from Charles Lockhart of Kindeace, using his property near Cromarty harbour as security. He was also allowed to run up arrears of rent amounting, at his death in 1810, to almost £400. Writing in 1836, Hugh Miller saw Middleton as the key improver of the period, whose innovations included building the first steam thrashing mill. He grew wheat, although he considered that it was not prudent to risk sowing too much of this crop, and by sowing Polish oats, rather than older varieties, he was achieving a sixteenfold return. Middleton also engaged in other business - trade in salt cod and pork, the tenancy of the meal and flower mill at Braelangwell, and a short-lived attempt to ship flagstone from a quarry at Davidston. The improvements to Davidstone can be seen on the estate maps of 1823 in the form of larger, consolidated fields forming a 300-acre farm. The farm had been created by the removal of eleven tenants - among forty-five on the estate who were served with summons of removal in 1794 and 1795. There was, understandably, resentment and in 1815 Middleton's house was damaged by a mob who suspected him of hoarding grain.'<br /> <br /> Rugadh 's thogadh Daibhidh Alston air a' Ghàidhealtachd agus tha e air fuireach ann an Cromba fad fhichead bliadhna. Fhuair e PhD ann an Eachdraidh Albannach o Oilthigh Dhùin Deagh ann an 1999. <br /> <br /> Tha Daibhidh air a bhith an luib obair Taigh-cùirte Chrombaigh fad iomadh bliadhna, an toiseach san leasachadh dheth agus an uair sin mar thaigh-tasgaidh beatha Chrombaigh. Chaidh a thaghadh do Chomhairle na Gàidhealtachd an toiseach ann an 1999 agus tha e an-diugh na fhear-cathrach aig Comataidh Sgrùdaidh is Mion-sheallaidh (Audit & Scrutiny). A bharrachd air eachdraidh thomaideach air Cromba, foillsichte ann an 2006, 's e an t-ùghdar aig iomadh leabhran air eachdraidh na sgìre.