Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 22/05/2017
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TIOTAL
'Ross and Cromarty, A Historical Guide'
EXTERNAL ID
AB_LL_DAVID_ALSTON_04
ÀITE
Cromba
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Crombaidh
DEIT
2008
LINN
2000an
CRUTHADAIR
David Alston
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Am Baile
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1281
KEYWORDS
claistinneach
cruthan-tìre litreachais

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Tha a' chuibhreann chlaistinneach seo o 'Ross and Cromarty, A Historical Guide', le Daibhidh Alston, foillsichte an toiseach ann an 1999. Tha e air a leughadh an seo leis an ùghdar.

'This is my introduction to my historical guide to Ross and Cromarty. Before my introduction, I've placed two quotations from Scottish poets; the first from Sorley Maclean, who, translated into English, writes,

'Time stops on the mountain
and is idle in my desire
for in my thoughts they are equal,
those of yesterday and the day before it.

Equal in my thoughts
those lasting and those gone and neglected ...'

And the second quotation is from Edwin Muir's poem, 'The Difficult Land' which he concludes by saying, of Scotland,

'This is a difficult country, and our home.'

Here is my introduction:

I would like this Guide, which contains many hard and perhaps dry facts, to be not just of the head but also of the heart, and with this intention have prefaced it with two quotations from Scottish poets which convey both thoughts and feelings about landscape.

Ross and Cromarty is, like Scotland as a whole, a difficult country - particularly, a historian might add, since the deterioration of the climate around 1200 BC. It has been a continuing challenge to find the right balance between arable farming, grazing and fishing, and attempts to introduce industry and manufacturing have seldom been successful. Struggles between rival groups for control of limited resources have been bitter and the difficulties, and the rivalries, have been greatest in the Highland and western parts.

The present landscape reflects the problems, struggles, successes and failures of teh past. It has been moulded to its shape by the labours of many generations - not primarily by those who can be named but by those gone and neglected who still, if we are concerned with the place and its history, make their claim on us from the other side of time.

The labours of the dead, those of yesterday and the day before it, and the labours of those living today have an equal value. The dead are, nonethless, gone and our only way to engage with them is by making the effort to see their lives and their times as they were - in truth and without romanticism. To give sufficient attention to see things both as they are, and as they were, is an act of love, from which we should not refrain - for this, although a difficult country, is our home.'

Rugadh 's thogadh Daibhidh Alston air a' Ghàidhealtachd agus tha e air fuireach ann an Cromba fad fhichead bliadhna. Fhuair e PhD ann an Eachdraidh Albannach o Oilthigh Dhùin Deagh ann an 1999.

Tha Daibhidh air a bhith an luib obair Taigh-cùirte Chrombaigh fad iomadh bliadhna, an toiseach san leasachadh dheth agus an uair sin mar thaigh-tasgaidh beatha Chrombaigh. Chaidh a thaghadh do Chomhairle na Gàidhealtachd an toiseach ann an 1999 agus tha e an-diugh na fhear-cathrach aig Comataidh Sgrùdaidh is Mion-sheallaidh (Audit & Scrutiny). A bharrachd air eachdraidh thomaideach air Cromba, foillsichte ann an 2006, 's e an t-ùghdar aig iomadh leabhran air eachdraidh na sgìre.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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'Ross and Cromarty, A Historical Guide'

ROS: Crombaidh

2000an

claistinneach; cruthan-tìre litreachais

Am Baile

Literary Landscapes: David Alston

Tha a' chuibhreann chlaistinneach seo o 'Ross and Cromarty, A Historical Guide', le Daibhidh Alston, foillsichte an toiseach ann an 1999. Tha e air a leughadh an seo leis an ùghdar.<br /> <br /> 'This is my introduction to my historical guide to Ross and Cromarty. Before my introduction, I've placed two quotations from Scottish poets; the first from Sorley Maclean, who, translated into English, writes,<br /> <br /> 'Time stops on the mountain<br /> and is idle in my desire<br /> for in my thoughts they are equal,<br /> those of yesterday and the day before it.<br /> <br /> Equal in my thoughts<br /> those lasting and those gone and neglected ...'<br /> <br /> And the second quotation is from Edwin Muir's poem, 'The Difficult Land' which he concludes by saying, of Scotland, <br /> <br /> 'This is a difficult country, and our home.'<br /> <br /> Here is my introduction:<br /> <br /> I would like this Guide, which contains many hard and perhaps dry facts, to be not just of the head but also of the heart, and with this intention have prefaced it with two quotations from Scottish poets which convey both thoughts and feelings about landscape.<br /> <br /> Ross and Cromarty is, like Scotland as a whole, a difficult country - particularly, a historian might add, since the deterioration of the climate around 1200 BC. It has been a continuing challenge to find the right balance between arable farming, grazing and fishing, and attempts to introduce industry and manufacturing have seldom been successful. Struggles between rival groups for control of limited resources have been bitter and the difficulties, and the rivalries, have been greatest in the Highland and western parts.<br /> <br /> The present landscape reflects the problems, struggles, successes and failures of teh past. It has been moulded to its shape by the labours of many generations - not primarily by those who can be named but by those gone and neglected who still, if we are concerned with the place and its history, make their claim on us from the other side of time.<br /> <br /> The labours of the dead, those of yesterday and the day before it, and the labours of those living today have an equal value. The dead are, nonethless, gone and our only way to engage with them is by making the effort to see their lives and their times as they were - in truth and without romanticism. To give sufficient attention to see things both as they are, and as they were, is an act of love, from which we should not refrain - for this, although a difficult country, is our home.'<br /> <br /> Rugadh 's thogadh Daibhidh Alston air a' Ghàidhealtachd agus tha e air fuireach ann an Cromba fad fhichead bliadhna. Fhuair e PhD ann an Eachdraidh Albannach o Oilthigh Dhùin Deagh ann an 1999. <br /> <br /> Tha Daibhidh air a bhith an luib obair Taigh-cùirte Chrombaigh fad iomadh bliadhna, an toiseach san leasachadh dheth agus an uair sin mar thaigh-tasgaidh beatha Chrombaigh. Chaidh a thaghadh do Chomhairle na Gàidhealtachd an toiseach ann an 1999 agus tha e an-diugh na fhear-cathrach aig Comataidh Sgrùdaidh is Mion-sheallaidh (Audit & Scrutiny). A bharrachd air eachdraidh thomaideach air Cromba, foillsichte ann an 2006, 's e an t-ùghdar aig iomadh leabhran air eachdraidh na sgìre.