Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Aonghas Grannd air Tòmas MacAnndra
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ANGUSGRANT_08
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Aonghas Grant
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1570
KEYWORDS
Aonghas Grannd
fìdhlearan
ceòl traidiseanta
Tomas MacAnndra
claistinneach

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Tha Aonghas Grannd, no am fìdhlear ciotach à Loch Abar, air a bhith a' cluich air an fhidhill bhon a bha e trì bliadhna deug a dh'aois. Tha e air a bhith na dhreuchd mar fhìdhlear o chionn còrr is trì fichead bliadhna agus tha e fhathast a' dol mar thidsear, a' sgrìobhadh ciùil, agus a' cluich ann an seiseanan agus leis fhèin, is e a' cluich iomadh seòrsa ciùil air an fhidhill. Tha Gàidhlig aig Aonghas agus tha e ainmeil airson na stoidhle cluiche aige 'stoidhle na Gàidhealtachd an Iar', air a bheil a' Ghàidhlig agus ceòl na pìob a' toirt buaidh mhòr. San earrainn èisteachd seo, a chaidh a chlàradh an toiseach airson 'Moray Firth People' aig deireadh nan 1990an, cluinnear Aonghas is e a' bruidhinn ri Andy Ross mu Thòmas (Tammy) MacAnndra MBE (1910-1991) fìdhlear ainmeil à Sealtainn.

Interviewer: How and when did you start teaching fiddle?

Well, I just started off well, something like the way I started at home with my son, Angus Rory, when he was about five. And my brother Hamish bought him a wee fiddle, and within a week he was playing half a dozen tunes - he just was a natural player. And then I went down to the Blairgowrie Festival, and the first time Tom came down from Shetland and started competitions for the TMSA [Traditional Music & Song Association of Scotland] and Tom was judging the fiddle, and he put up the cup for it. And there was a big, big crowd, I think there was maybe thirty entries from all over the place, and I was about the thirtieth - I think I was the very last one - and I went - there was a pub opposite and Hamish Henderson - the School of [Scottish] Studies and one of this Irish boys, Fury, old Ted Fury, there we'd a great session, all afternoon. Forgot all about the competition and some wee lassie came and said, 'Is Angus Grant here? They're on the second last fiddler.' So, I went in and I was in great form after playing all afternoon and Tom was awful wide looking and he said, 'What ist doo going to play boy?', in the strong Shetland accent. You'd to play three tunes. It's 'Niel Gow's Lament for his Second Wife', 'Jeff MacKenzie' and 'Captain MacDiarmid'. And I went up and I played - no nerves, nothing, after playing all morning, and the fiddle all warmed up and - Eventually, I won it, and became friends - that's when I met Anderson first and he invited me - When he started up the summer school he wanted me to come down and teach the Highland style and I said, 'Well, apart from my son I've never taught anyone.' 'Oh', he says, 'Doos'll get on fine', he said and - So that was it and twenty years later I'm still there. Tom's gone but the thing's still going on.

Interviewer: Tom's a man you couldn't argue with?

Oh no. He was too big for a start! But he was a - he was a great, he'd a great - what's the word - charisma, about him. And he could - on one hand he could be so rude and abrupt to people, and then he could turn round and charm the birds off the trees. And he was a wonderful raconteur - ye could listen to him all night; he could talk about anything from music, to paintings, and spiritualism, and all sorts of - He seemed to have read a lot and he could, when he was in form, great form, he was wonderful company altogether, but he could fly off the handle so quick if things weren't going right. But he made such a great - He did so much for, not only Shetland fiddle music, but for fiddle music all over Scotland. It's nice to think, you know, the great heritage he left of young players and the wonderful tunes he composed, equal to anything that Gow and Skinner composed, and there's still more books getting produced from his manuscripts. I enjoy teaching at Stirling because one of his great pupils, Catriona MacDonald, is with me there. We were in the same week and I'm very fond of Catriona. We've been there together since she was a little girl and now she's teaching and she's a wonderful player

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Aonghas Grannd air Tòmas MacAnndra

1990an

Aonghas Grannd; fìdhlearan; ceòl traidiseanta; Tomas MacAnndra; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Angus Grant

Tha Aonghas Grannd, no am fìdhlear ciotach à Loch Abar, air a bhith a' cluich air an fhidhill bhon a bha e trì bliadhna deug a dh'aois. Tha e air a bhith na dhreuchd mar fhìdhlear o chionn còrr is trì fichead bliadhna agus tha e fhathast a' dol mar thidsear, a' sgrìobhadh ciùil, agus a' cluich ann an seiseanan agus leis fhèin, is e a' cluich iomadh seòrsa ciùil air an fhidhill. Tha Gàidhlig aig Aonghas agus tha e ainmeil airson na stoidhle cluiche aige 'stoidhle na Gàidhealtachd an Iar', air a bheil a' Ghàidhlig agus ceòl na pìob a' toirt buaidh mhòr. San earrainn èisteachd seo, a chaidh a chlàradh an toiseach airson 'Moray Firth People' aig deireadh nan 1990an, cluinnear Aonghas is e a' bruidhinn ri Andy Ross mu Thòmas (Tammy) MacAnndra MBE (1910-1991) fìdhlear ainmeil à Sealtainn.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How and when did you start teaching fiddle? <br /> <br /> Well, I just started off well, something like the way I started at home with my son, Angus Rory, when he was about five. And my brother Hamish bought him a wee fiddle, and within a week he was playing half a dozen tunes - he just was a natural player. And then I went down to the Blairgowrie Festival, and the first time Tom came down from Shetland and started competitions for the TMSA [Traditional Music & Song Association of Scotland] and Tom was judging the fiddle, and he put up the cup for it. And there was a big, big crowd, I think there was maybe thirty entries from all over the place, and I was about the thirtieth - I think I was the very last one - and I went - there was a pub opposite and Hamish Henderson - the School of [Scottish] Studies and one of this Irish boys, Fury, old Ted Fury, there we'd a great session, all afternoon. Forgot all about the competition and some wee lassie came and said, 'Is Angus Grant here? They're on the second last fiddler.' So, I went in and I was in great form after playing all afternoon and Tom was awful wide looking and he said, 'What ist doo going to play boy?', in the strong Shetland accent. You'd to play three tunes. It's 'Niel Gow's Lament for his Second Wife', 'Jeff MacKenzie' and 'Captain MacDiarmid'. And I went up and I played - no nerves, nothing, after playing all morning, and the fiddle all warmed up and - Eventually, I won it, and became friends - that's when I met Anderson first and he invited me - When he started up the summer school he wanted me to come down and teach the Highland style and I said, 'Well, apart from my son I've never taught anyone.' 'Oh', he says, 'Doos'll get on fine', he said and - So that was it and twenty years later I'm still there. Tom's gone but the thing's still going on.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Tom's a man you couldn't argue with?<br /> <br /> Oh no. He was too big for a start! But he was a - he was a great, he'd a great - what's the word - charisma, about him. And he could - on one hand he could be so rude and abrupt to people, and then he could turn round and charm the birds off the trees. And he was a wonderful raconteur - ye could listen to him all night; he could talk about anything from music, to paintings, and spiritualism, and all sorts of - He seemed to have read a lot and he could, when he was in form, great form, he was wonderful company altogether, but he could fly off the handle so quick if things weren't going right. But he made such a great - He did so much for, not only Shetland fiddle music, but for fiddle music all over Scotland. It's nice to think, you know, the great heritage he left of young players and the wonderful tunes he composed, equal to anything that Gow and Skinner composed, and there's still more books getting produced from his manuscripts. I enjoy teaching at Stirling because one of his great pupils, Catriona MacDonald, is with me there. We were in the same week and I'm very fond of Catriona. We've been there together since she was a little girl and now she's teaching and she's a wonderful player