Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Eachdraidh Choinnich Odhair
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ELIZSUTHERLAND_05
DEIT
1991
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Elizabeth Sutherland
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1615
KEYWORDS
an dà shealladh
fàidheadaireachd
fàisneachd
Seumas VI
claistinneach

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B' e fiosaiche ainmeal bhon t-seachdamh linn deug aig an robh an dà shealladh a bh' ann an Coinneach Odhar. Tha mòran dhe na thuirt e a thachradh air tighinn gu buil. Anns an earrainn labhairt seo, a chaidh a thogail bhon t-sreath 'Recollections' air Moray Firth Radio, tha Ealasaid Nic an t-Sutharlanaich ag innse mu eachdraidh agus na bha an dàn do Choinneach Odhar.

After making his prediction that the Countess Isabella of Seaforth's husband, the Earl of Seaforth, was having an affair with a French woman, Isabella the Countess, instead of being angry with her husband, took it out on the wretched Seer and ordered that he be burned or be brought to trial which was of course a foregone conclusion. And he was burned down by the lighthouse on Fortrose Ness and there's a stone there that marks the event. The interesting thing is that there is a historically documented figure of that name but he lived, in fact, a century before the third Earl and Countess of Seaforth. He must have been a very sinister figure indeed because he's mentioned in two writs ordering his arrest by the high heid yins of Ross-Shire and Inverness, and the writs were issued at Holyrood Palace by Jamie Saxt (James the Sixth). They mention him as Coinneach, spelt as an English clerk would spell that word, K.E.N.O.C.H., Odhar, which means sallow or sun-burned, spelt O.W.I.R., the way the Gaelic pronounce it but not the way it's spelt, and he was described as the principal leader in the art of magic, incantation, and poisoning. So a very sinister figure. I think what happened there was that he was such a dominant figure in the sixteenth century that he was turned into a folk hero, an anti-establishment martyr, really, by the story tellers who needed a hero, and who better than someone who had been persecuted by the lairds? His predictions, in fact, cover five centuries so I think what's happened is the term, 'Brahan Seer', is a collective word for all Highland Seers throughout the centuries, and there have been many, many of them

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Eachdraidh Choinnich Odhair

1990an

an dà shealladh; fàidheadaireachd; fàisneachd; Seumas VI; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Brahan Seer

B' e fiosaiche ainmeal bhon t-seachdamh linn deug aig an robh an dà shealladh a bh' ann an Coinneach Odhar. Tha mòran dhe na thuirt e a thachradh air tighinn gu buil. Anns an earrainn labhairt seo, a chaidh a thogail bhon t-sreath 'Recollections' air Moray Firth Radio, tha Ealasaid Nic an t-Sutharlanaich ag innse mu eachdraidh agus na bha an dàn do Choinneach Odhar.<br /> <br /> After making his prediction that the Countess Isabella of Seaforth's husband, the Earl of Seaforth, was having an affair with a French woman, Isabella the Countess, instead of being angry with her husband, took it out on the wretched Seer and ordered that he be burned or be brought to trial which was of course a foregone conclusion. And he was burned down by the lighthouse on Fortrose Ness and there's a stone there that marks the event. The interesting thing is that there is a historically documented figure of that name but he lived, in fact, a century before the third Earl and Countess of Seaforth. He must have been a very sinister figure indeed because he's mentioned in two writs ordering his arrest by the high heid yins of Ross-Shire and Inverness, and the writs were issued at Holyrood Palace by Jamie Saxt (James the Sixth). They mention him as Coinneach, spelt as an English clerk would spell that word, K.E.N.O.C.H., Odhar, which means sallow or sun-burned, spelt O.W.I.R., the way the Gaelic pronounce it but not the way it's spelt, and he was described as the principal leader in the art of magic, incantation, and poisoning. So a very sinister figure. I think what happened there was that he was such a dominant figure in the sixteenth century that he was turned into a folk hero, an anti-establishment martyr, really, by the story tellers who needed a hero, and who better than someone who had been persecuted by the lairds? His predictions, in fact, cover five centuries so I think what's happened is the term, 'Brahan Seer', is a collective word for all Highland Seers throughout the centuries, and there have been many, many of them