Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 08/11/2017
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TIOTAL
Seòras Grannd mu Bhristeadh Phattison
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_GEORGEGRANT_08
ÀITE
Baile na Dalach
LINN
1980an
CRUTHADAIR
George S. Grant
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1642
KEYWORDS
grùdairean
taighean-staile
Granndaich Gleann Farghlais
claistinneach

Get Adobe Flash player

Bha Seòras Grannd (1923-2002) na cheann-suidhe air Taigh-Staile Gleann Farghlais ri taobh Abhainn Spè fad lethcheud bliadhna 's a dhà. Cheannaich a shinnsear, Iain Grannd, an taigh-staile ann an 1865, agus tha e air a bhith aig an teaghlach Grannd on uair sin. 'S e Iain L S Grannd, mac Sheòrais, an ceann-suidhe aige an-dràsta. Anns an earrainn chlaistinnich seo, a chaidh a chlàradh o thùs ann an 1983 do 'Mhoray Firth People', tha Seòras a' bruidhinn ri Sam Marshall mu dheidhinn Bristeadh Pattison ann an 1898-99.

Interviewer: You mentioned the Pattison Crash, what was that?

It was a firm in Leith run by Pattison Brothers who overextended themselves in the whisky business. They were sitting on huge stocks which was held on the bank overdraft. In those days Bills of Exchange which you very seldom see today - in fact, we haven't seem them for a long time - and what brought them to a sticky end was a bank refused to honour a bill. And of course it was like pulling the key card out of a house of cards - the rest just collapsed on them. That knocked the bottom out the whisky market for aged whiskies and of course they couldn't sell the stock.

Interviewer: How long did it take the industry to recover after that one?

Well, that's a difficult one to answer because they were only getting over it when Lloyd George brought in his budget to kill the trade. Then you had the First World War and that brought in aging whisky. Up until then they could drink it straight from the still, but Lloyd George again decided they had to age it for three years in order to cut down drunkenness amongst the troops etc, which of course is why we had the Invergordon state of affairs that you know about, and Carlisle.

Interviewer: What happened in Carlisle?

Well, they had a munitions factory somewhere about Carlisle and it was the same set of affairs. They turned Carlisle and Invergordon into states - public houses - I've forgotten the name of it, off hand. But all the licences belonged to the state and it's only within the last ten or fifteen years that they changed the law for these two parts

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
Powered by Capture

Seòras Grannd mu Bhristeadh Phattison

1980an

grùdairean; taighean-staile; Granndaich Gleann Farghlais; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: George Grant, Glenfarclas Distillery

Bha Seòras Grannd (1923-2002) na cheann-suidhe air Taigh-Staile Gleann Farghlais ri taobh Abhainn Spè fad lethcheud bliadhna 's a dhà. Cheannaich a shinnsear, Iain Grannd, an taigh-staile ann an 1865, agus tha e air a bhith aig an teaghlach Grannd on uair sin. 'S e Iain L S Grannd, mac Sheòrais, an ceann-suidhe aige an-dràsta. Anns an earrainn chlaistinnich seo, a chaidh a chlàradh o thùs ann an 1983 do 'Mhoray Firth People', tha Seòras a' bruidhinn ri Sam Marshall mu dheidhinn Bristeadh Pattison ann an 1898-99.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You mentioned the Pattison Crash, what was that?<br /> <br /> It was a firm in Leith run by Pattison Brothers who overextended themselves in the whisky business. They were sitting on huge stocks which was held on the bank overdraft. In those days Bills of Exchange which you very seldom see today - in fact, we haven't seem them for a long time - and what brought them to a sticky end was a bank refused to honour a bill. And of course it was like pulling the key card out of a house of cards - the rest just collapsed on them. That knocked the bottom out the whisky market for aged whiskies and of course they couldn't sell the stock.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: How long did it take the industry to recover after that one?<br /> <br /> Well, that's a difficult one to answer because they were only getting over it when Lloyd George brought in his budget to kill the trade. Then you had the First World War and that brought in aging whisky. Up until then they could drink it straight from the still, but Lloyd George again decided they had to age it for three years in order to cut down drunkenness amongst the troops etc, which of course is why we had the Invergordon state of affairs that you know about, and Carlisle. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: What happened in Carlisle?<br /> <br /> Well, they had a munitions factory somewhere about Carlisle and it was the same set of affairs. They turned Carlisle and Invergordon into states - public houses - I've forgotten the name of it, off hand. But all the licences belonged to the state and it's only within the last ten or fifteen years that they changed the law for these two parts