Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Bàta-teasairginn Inhbir Ghòrdain
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_INVERGORDONLIFEBOAT
ÀITE
Inbhir Ghòrdain
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Ros Cuithne
DEIT
1991
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
unknown
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1697
KEYWORDS
Buidheann Rìoghail Nàiseanta nam Bàta Teasairginn
cobhair mara
claistinneach

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Dh'fhosgail Buidheann Rìoghail Nàiseanta nam Bàta Teasairginn stèisean ann an Inbhir Ghòrdain ann an 1974 gus seirbheis na b' fheàrr a chumail ri cost an ear thuath Alba. An-duigh, tha bàta-teasairginn iomadh-aimsir dhen chlas Trent ag obair a-mach às an stèisean. San earrainn èisteachd seo le Moray Forth Radio bho 1991, cluinnear saor-thagraiche a' beachdachadh air bàta-teasairginn a b' àbhaist a bhith aca - bàta-teasairginn Waveney, a chaidh a chleachdach eadar 1989 is 1996.

'Well, this boat here we've had for two years now. It's a Waveney Class lifeboat; one of the original fast afloat lifeboats which the Royal National Lifeboat Institution developed for rescue purposes.

Interviewer: You were saying earlier that it's on the same lines as the old American patrol boats, too?

Yes, the design of this particular class of lifeboat originated from the U.S. Coastguard cutter and it's a very, very suitable boat for rough weather.

Interviewer: The shape of it is quite high at the front and then sort of slopes down. What's the actual boat made of itself?

The hull of the boat is made from Cor-ten steel; the decks and the superstructure from aluminium for, for lightness. The boat is powered by two General Motors Detroit Diesel, two-stroke diesel engines, for those who are interested, and produce 520 break horsepower.

Interviewer: The wheelhouse is open. That must cause problems?

Well, it's open, open from the back end and we can, in fact, fix a plastic cover over the back end, if the weather's coming in but, you know, one of things that we prefer is you can use this sixth sense that we like; you can feel the weather. It can be miserable at times, I must be honest about that, but the new lifeboats all have an enclosed wheelhouse, a) for crew comfort and for survivor comfort and b) as part of the self-righting capabilities. This boat manages to self-right because of the aftercabin, and the forecabins, and the weight of the engines so very much lower down than some of the newer boats are.

Interviewer: So, by being in the open wheelhouse, you're saying it gives you a feel for what's going on? Much more of a - ?

Oh, very much so. In fact, it's interesting, whilst the new lifeboats had an enclosed wheelhouse, they've also installed an outside steering position, so that when the boat is coming towards a casualty or manoeuvring in close quarters, the coxswain can maintain this feel for what's going on.

Interviewer: The boat itself, what's the history of the boat?

This boat was launched first of all in 1974, and was on service at Whitby in the northeast of England until two years ago. And we, at that time, were looking for a boat like this and we went down and pinched it from them, before anyone else could get it.

Interviewer: Did you choose it because of its particular character?

Yes. We don't really need a boat as large as an Arun in this area here.

Interviewer: That's the one that Buckie have, isn't it?

That's similar to Buckie's yes, and Aberdeen, and Thurso, but we need an all-weather lifeboat, or an off-, what they call an offshore lifeboat, and, as you can see, the nature of the craft that use this place are all large ships, oilrigs. They're all made of steel and it's very comforting to know that we have also a steel hull underneath us, instead of a glass fibre or a wooden hull which is very easily damaged'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Bàta-teasairginn Inhbir Ghòrdain

ROS: Ros Cuithne

1990an

Buidheann Rìoghail Nàiseanta nam Bàta Teasairginn; cobhair mara; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Miscellaneous

Dh'fhosgail Buidheann Rìoghail Nàiseanta nam Bàta Teasairginn stèisean ann an Inbhir Ghòrdain ann an 1974 gus seirbheis na b' fheàrr a chumail ri cost an ear thuath Alba. An-duigh, tha bàta-teasairginn iomadh-aimsir dhen chlas Trent ag obair a-mach às an stèisean. San earrainn èisteachd seo le Moray Forth Radio bho 1991, cluinnear saor-thagraiche a' beachdachadh air bàta-teasairginn a b' àbhaist a bhith aca - bàta-teasairginn Waveney, a chaidh a chleachdach eadar 1989 is 1996.<br /> <br /> 'Well, this boat here we've had for two years now. It's a Waveney Class lifeboat; one of the original fast afloat lifeboats which the Royal National Lifeboat Institution developed for rescue purposes.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You were saying earlier that it's on the same lines as the old American patrol boats, too?<br /> <br /> Yes, the design of this particular class of lifeboat originated from the U.S. Coastguard cutter and it's a very, very suitable boat for rough weather.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The shape of it is quite high at the front and then sort of slopes down. What's the actual boat made of itself? <br /> <br /> The hull of the boat is made from Cor-ten steel; the decks and the superstructure from aluminium for, for lightness. The boat is powered by two General Motors Detroit Diesel, two-stroke diesel engines, for those who are interested, and produce 520 break horsepower.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The wheelhouse is open. That must cause problems? <br /> <br /> Well, it's open, open from the back end and we can, in fact, fix a plastic cover over the back end, if the weather's coming in but, you know, one of things that we prefer is you can use this sixth sense that we like; you can feel the weather. It can be miserable at times, I must be honest about that, but the new lifeboats all have an enclosed wheelhouse, a) for crew comfort and for survivor comfort and b) as part of the self-righting capabilities. This boat manages to self-right because of the aftercabin, and the forecabins, and the weight of the engines so very much lower down than some of the newer boats are.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: So, by being in the open wheelhouse, you're saying it gives you a feel for what's going on? Much more of a - ?<br /> <br /> Oh, very much so. In fact, it's interesting, whilst the new lifeboats had an enclosed wheelhouse, they've also installed an outside steering position, so that when the boat is coming towards a casualty or manoeuvring in close quarters, the coxswain can maintain this feel for what's going on.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: The boat itself, what's the history of the boat?<br /> <br /> This boat was launched first of all in 1974, and was on service at Whitby in the northeast of England until two years ago. And we, at that time, were looking for a boat like this and we went down and pinched it from them, before anyone else could get it.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: Did you choose it because of its particular character?<br /> <br /> Yes. We don't really need a boat as large as an Arun in this area here. <br /> <br /> Interviewer: That's the one that Buckie have, isn't it?<br /> <br /> That's similar to Buckie's yes, and Aberdeen, and Thurso, but we need an all-weather lifeboat, or an off-, what they call an offshore lifeboat, and, as you can see, the nature of the craft that use this place are all large ships, oilrigs. They're all made of steel and it's very comforting to know that we have also a steel hull underneath us, instead of a glass fibre or a wooden hull which is very easily damaged'