Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 15/08/2017
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TIOTAL
Tubaist-adhair Dhiùc Kent, Gallaibh (1 à 3)
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMHENDERSON_01
ÀITE
Dùn Beithe
SGÌRE
Gallaibh a Deas
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
GALLAIBH: Latharan
DEIT
1991
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Jim Henderson
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1711
KEYWORDS
An Dara Cogadh
co-fheall
co-fheallan
bualadh
tubaistean
tubaist
claistinneach

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Chaidh am Prionnsa Seòras, Diùc Khent (1902-1942) a mharbhadh ann an tubaist adhair anns an Dara Cogadh aig Creag na h-Iolaire, faisg air Dùn Beatha, Gallaibh.
Bha am 'Bàta Itealaich Sunderland' san robh e ag itealaich gu h-oifigeil air an t-slighe a dh'Innis Tìle far an robh an Diùc a' dol a choinneachadh ri buill de armachd Ameiriga. San earrainn seo, cluinnear Seumas Mac Eanraig, a b' abhaist a bhith na neach-deasachaidh aig an Northern Times, a' beachdachadh air ceistean mun tubaist. Tha an earrann bhon t-sreath de phrògraman 'Recollections'.

'He [Duke of Kent] was the only member of the royal family in recent times to have died on active service, and it would appear as if the records had been closed as a result of this. For some reason an air of mystery has existed for all of fifty years and people who can still recall the crash on Eagle's Mount [Rock], near Dunbeath, in Caithness, still talk about it in rather hushed tones. They always seem to think that there is something sinister and there have been all sorts of theories. There's been the sabotage theory, the idea that because like the Duke of Windsor, the Duke of Kent may, in fact, have been a pro-German sympathizer to an extent. Someone may have decided to have him rubbed out. There's a suggestion that the instrumentation panel on the Sunderland flying boat may have been tampered with before it took off from Invergordon. There's the suggestion that because the wing commander, the officer commanding the squadron at Oban where the Sunderland flying boat was based, actually took controls of the aircraft, he was less able to fly the plane than the pilot who was an Australian; Flight Lieutenant Frank Goyen. Now it could well be that the young pilot was rather overawed by his senior officer and although he filed the flight plan it may well have been that the wing commander flew a different flight.

There's also the most incredible thing - out of the crew of eleven only one survived and he was the rear gunner, Andrew Jack. And it's said that he remembered quite distinctly, when the plane was still about ten miles out from the coast, he heard the captain, and we presume that would be the wing commander, saying something like, 'Let's go down and have look.' Now, what were they going to have a look at in low cloud conditions, flying out from Invergordon in the Cromarty Firth, heading for Iceland? It may well have been they decided to have a look at a ship. It could be that they wanted to have a look at Dunrobin Castle. And here's a very ironic twist. The body of the Duke of Kent after that crash was taken to Dunrobin Castle to lie in state until his remains were taken south to London for burial'

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Tubaist-adhair Dhiùc Kent, Gallaibh (1 à 3)

GALLAIBH: Latharan

1990an

An Dara Cogadh; co-fheall; co-fheallan; bualadh; tubaistean; tubaist; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Duke of Kent Plane Crash

Chaidh am Prionnsa Seòras, Diùc Khent (1902-1942) a mharbhadh ann an tubaist adhair anns an Dara Cogadh aig Creag na h-Iolaire, faisg air Dùn Beatha, Gallaibh.<br /> Bha am 'Bàta Itealaich Sunderland' san robh e ag itealaich gu h-oifigeil air an t-slighe a dh'Innis Tìle far an robh an Diùc a' dol a choinneachadh ri buill de armachd Ameiriga. San earrainn seo, cluinnear Seumas Mac Eanraig, a b' abhaist a bhith na neach-deasachaidh aig an Northern Times, a' beachdachadh air ceistean mun tubaist. Tha an earrann bhon t-sreath de phrògraman 'Recollections'.<br /> <br /> 'He [Duke of Kent] was the only member of the royal family in recent times to have died on active service, and it would appear as if the records had been closed as a result of this. For some reason an air of mystery has existed for all of fifty years and people who can still recall the crash on Eagle's Mount [Rock], near Dunbeath, in Caithness, still talk about it in rather hushed tones. They always seem to think that there is something sinister and there have been all sorts of theories. There's been the sabotage theory, the idea that because like the Duke of Windsor, the Duke of Kent may, in fact, have been a pro-German sympathizer to an extent. Someone may have decided to have him rubbed out. There's a suggestion that the instrumentation panel on the Sunderland flying boat may have been tampered with before it took off from Invergordon. There's the suggestion that because the wing commander, the officer commanding the squadron at Oban where the Sunderland flying boat was based, actually took controls of the aircraft, he was less able to fly the plane than the pilot who was an Australian; Flight Lieutenant Frank Goyen. Now it could well be that the young pilot was rather overawed by his senior officer and although he filed the flight plan it may well have been that the wing commander flew a different flight. <br /> <br /> There's also the most incredible thing - out of the crew of eleven only one survived and he was the rear gunner, Andrew Jack. And it's said that he remembered quite distinctly, when the plane was still about ten miles out from the coast, he heard the captain, and we presume that would be the wing commander, saying something like, 'Let's go down and have look.' Now, what were they going to have a look at in low cloud conditions, flying out from Invergordon in the Cromarty Firth, heading for Iceland? It may well have been they decided to have a look at a ship. It could be that they wanted to have a look at Dunrobin Castle. And here's a very ironic twist. The body of the Duke of Kent after that crash was taken to Dunrobin Castle to lie in state until his remains were taken south to London for burial'