Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 23/11/2017
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TIOTAL
Jim Love - Air Shackleton
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_JIMLOVE_15
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Jim Love
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1736
KEYWORDS
claistinneach

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B' e Jim Love (1943-2006) fear de na fir-naidheachd a b' urramaich air a' Ghàidhealtachd. Chaidh e dhan 'Inverness Courier' ann an 1988, agus na dheasaiche air ann an 2003. Roimhe sin 's e neach-naidheachd aig a' 'Phress and Journal' a bh' ann, ag obair an Inbhir Nis. Bha Jim uabhasach ùidheil air ceòl jazz, ach cuideachd bha e gu mòr an sàs a' toirt fàs air taobh a' chiùil traidiseanta air a' Ghàidhealtachd sna 1990an 's na 2000an.

Sa chuibhreann chlaistinneach seo on phrògram rèidio 'Moray Firth People' tha Jim a' còmhradh ri Helen MacPherson mu thuras-itealain a rinn e air pleana Shackleton.

Interviewer: You must have a few stories to tell?

Yes, one that stands out from my early days was - the RAF used to make a Christmas drop to the light ships, the north Atlantic weather ships, and they used to fly out from Kinloss and they used to drop Christmas trees, Christmas parcels, Christmas pudding to these guys who were somewhere two hundred miles due south of Iceland. And they always took the press with them to cover this and they would get some nice pictures of these Christmas goodies dropping out of a Shackleton onto a weather ship. And there were always two Shackletons did it; one to do the drop and one holding the press men to take the pictures and write the story. And I'm not a very good traveller and the night before we flew was the night of the officers' party at the mess at Kinloss and we were naturally invited to that.

So I thought, 'Well, flying the next day, I really don't want to drink too much, so a half pint of beer, but they were serving goulash. Now, on reflection, goulash was the wrong thing to eat, but when we got up into the plane the next morning I was extremely ill. And we did what any ordinary human being would do faced in that predicament, was to go to the toilet. But this isn't like British Airways and other people need to go to the toilet, and there's only one, and I had commandeered this toilet for the best part of the outward flight. So eventually they managed to prise me out of the toilet, propped me beside a porthole on the fuselage of the aircraft, I don't know if they call them portholes, and they opened the window so I could get some fresh air, flying at something like five thousand feet, and it's a miracle I didn't freeze to death. But there are still some pictures in existence of me in a flying helmet and a flying jacket with an enormous paper bag between my knees, dead to the world.

When we got back we discovered that there was some problems with one of the engines so, we were, thanks to the skill of the pilot, we got down no bother but our hearts were in our mouths for part of the time.

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Jim Love - Air Shackleton

1990an

claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: Jim Love

B' e Jim Love (1943-2006) fear de na fir-naidheachd a b' urramaich air a' Ghàidhealtachd. Chaidh e dhan 'Inverness Courier' ann an 1988, agus na dheasaiche air ann an 2003. Roimhe sin 's e neach-naidheachd aig a' 'Phress and Journal' a bh' ann, ag obair an Inbhir Nis. Bha Jim uabhasach ùidheil air ceòl jazz, ach cuideachd bha e gu mòr an sàs a' toirt fàs air taobh a' chiùil traidiseanta air a' Ghàidhealtachd sna 1990an 's na 2000an.<br /> <br /> Sa chuibhreann chlaistinneach seo on phrògram rèidio 'Moray Firth People' tha Jim a' còmhradh ri Helen MacPherson mu thuras-itealain a rinn e air pleana Shackleton.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: You must have a few stories to tell?<br /> <br /> Yes, one that stands out from my early days was - the RAF used to make a Christmas drop to the light ships, the north Atlantic weather ships, and they used to fly out from Kinloss and they used to drop Christmas trees, Christmas parcels, Christmas pudding to these guys who were somewhere two hundred miles due south of Iceland. And they always took the press with them to cover this and they would get some nice pictures of these Christmas goodies dropping out of a Shackleton onto a weather ship. And there were always two Shackletons did it; one to do the drop and one holding the press men to take the pictures and write the story. And I'm not a very good traveller and the night before we flew was the night of the officers' party at the mess at Kinloss and we were naturally invited to that. <br /> <br /> So I thought, 'Well, flying the next day, I really don't want to drink too much, so a half pint of beer, but they were serving goulash. Now, on reflection, goulash was the wrong thing to eat, but when we got up into the plane the next morning I was extremely ill. And we did what any ordinary human being would do faced in that predicament, was to go to the toilet. But this isn't like British Airways and other people need to go to the toilet, and there's only one, and I had commandeered this toilet for the best part of the outward flight. So eventually they managed to prise me out of the toilet, propped me beside a porthole on the fuselage of the aircraft, I don't know if they call them portholes, and they opened the window so I could get some fresh air, flying at something like five thousand feet, and it's a miracle I didn't freeze to death. But there are still some pictures in existence of me in a flying helmet and a flying jacket with an enormous paper bag between my knees, dead to the world. <br /> <br /> When we got back we discovered that there was some problems with one of the engines so, we were, thanks to the skill of the pilot, we got down no bother but our hearts were in our mouths for part of the time.