Ùrachadh mu Dheireadh 08/11/2017
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TIOTAL
Tùs Inbhir Pheofharain
EXTERNAL ID
GB232_MFR_ROBGIBSON_02
ÀITE
Inbhir Pheofharain
SIORRACHD/PARRAIST
ROS: Inbhir Pheofharain
DEIT
1991
LINN
1990an
CRUTHADAIR
Rob Gibson
NEACH-FIOSRACHAIDH
Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh
AITHNEACHADH MAOINE
1776
KEYWORDS
ainmean-àite
claistinneach

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San earrainn èisteachd seo, cluinnear Rob Gibson a' bruidhinn air cò às a thàinig an ainm-àite 'Dingwall'. Tha an earrann bhon t-sreath de phrògraman 'Recollections'.

Well Dingwall means 'Tinwald' [from the Old Norse 'Thing vollr'], it means 'the field of the courthouse. It really was the Norse centre for this area as they raided down and settled from Norway originally, and that means it's of slightly more recent origin than some of the Gaelic names. But, of course, it has its own Gaelic names; first of all to describe geographically the mouth of the Peffery, 'Inbhir Pheofharain' and also 'Baile càl', the 'town of cabbages' or 'kale' and so on. It's been a burgh since the Middle Ages but probably was founded by the Vikings because originally it's in a place which was fairly boggy. When you look at the names of the parishes round about here and the saints to whom each of the parishes is dedicated, they're all the Irish saints of the Celtic Church and so the Pictish population lived on and around this area. In Easter Ross, you know, the Pictish stones up in Nigg and at Pitcalnie and all these sort of areas, the Pictish names like Shandwick. But in this area, because Dingwall's in such a hollow, it's very unlikely that an early stage people lived in such ill-drained land and it was only when the Vikings arrived by sea and used it as a base for their sea-going activities that a town took off and a castle was built

Airson stiùireadh mu bhith a’ cleachdadh ìomhaighean agus susbaint eile, faicibh duilleag ‘Na Cumhaichean air Fad.’
’S e companaidh cuibhrichte fo bharantas clàraichte ann an Alba Àir. SC407011 agus carthannas clàraichte Albannach Àir. SC042593 a th’ ann an High Life na Gàidhealtachd.
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Tùs Inbhir Pheofharain

ROS: Inbhir Pheofharain

1990an

ainmean-àite; claistinneach

Rèidio Linne Mhoireibh

MFR: History of Dingwall

San earrainn èisteachd seo, cluinnear Rob Gibson a' bruidhinn air cò às a thàinig an ainm-àite 'Dingwall'. Tha an earrann bhon t-sreath de phrògraman 'Recollections'.<br /> <br /> Well Dingwall means 'Tinwald' [from the Old Norse 'Thing vollr'], it means 'the field of the courthouse. It really was the Norse centre for this area as they raided down and settled from Norway originally, and that means it's of slightly more recent origin than some of the Gaelic names. But, of course, it has its own Gaelic names; first of all to describe geographically the mouth of the Peffery, 'Inbhir Pheofharain' and also 'Baile càl', the 'town of cabbages' or 'kale' and so on. It's been a burgh since the Middle Ages but probably was founded by the Vikings because originally it's in a place which was fairly boggy. When you look at the names of the parishes round about here and the saints to whom each of the parishes is dedicated, they're all the Irish saints of the Celtic Church and so the Pictish population lived on and around this area. In Easter Ross, you know, the Pictish stones up in Nigg and at Pitcalnie and all these sort of areas, the Pictish names like Shandwick. But in this area, because Dingwall's in such a hollow, it's very unlikely that an early stage people lived in such ill-drained land and it was only when the Vikings arrived by sea and used it as a base for their sea-going activities that a town took off and a castle was built